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  • This should help:

    You should also have completed a DSE Workstation Assessment for your Health & Safety Dept.  Get it sorted quick as you don't want to live with a permanent back issue (as i do)

    Spice (75) flagReport
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  • How is your chair setup in relation to your monitor? Ideally you should be sitting up straight with your eyes pretty much parallel to the top of the monitor. Arms at a 90 degree angle to the keyboard and the keyboard high enough you can see it without tilting your head down.

    I break 99% of these guidelines, but my back and neck have always been fine. 

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  • I always have to look down at my monitor.  I was considering getting stands but I always put it off to the side.  Maybe it's time to invest.

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  • I think the biggest things for you are going to be the proper height for your monitor(s), keyboard and mouse, and your seat level at the desk.

    I have my monitors raised so my eye level is in the middle of my monitors. My keyboard and mouse are positioned so my elbows make a 45 degree angle and I have the keyboard and mouse at an angle away from my self. (imagine the keyboard legs on the front of the keyboard instead of the back. This helps my wrists and shoulders. As far as my seat, that is my bad spot because I tend to slouch back. I can feel a difference when I sit up straight with a pillow behind my back.

    I also get up and move around as much as I can. I try to talk to others about tickets or whatever and then I will follow up our discussion with an email.

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  • This may help

    http://www.underworks.com/mens-posture-corrector-shirt

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  • Kevin Keutmann wrote:

    This may help

    http://www.underworks.com/mens-posture-corrector-shirt


    I got blocked because it is listed as Lingerie and Swimsuit.
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  • Andrew Tramutolo wrote:

    I always have to look down at my monitor.  I was considering getting stands but I always put it off to the side.  Maybe it's time to invest.

    Looking down is pretty much just as bad for you as not sitting at a 90 degree angle. It forces the back muscles to strain constantly looking down, which in turn slowly works its way down your back. Consider propping it up, as well as abiding by the figure posted above by Probe. Ideally you want to remember the rule of 90, with a small tangent in there. 

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  • What you are experiencing is a shortening of your chest muscles and an overstretching of your upper back muscles (trapezious and rhomboids especially).  Aside from the good posture advice already suggested, you can counteract these imbalances by strengthening your back muscles and stretching your chest muscles. Strengthening the core is also key to keep the upper body aligned. Also be very aware when using a smartphone or tablet...the weight of your head looking down for long period of time really can do a number on the posture as well.

    If you google exercises for forward head syndrome or rhomboid exercises that will get you started.

    (PS. I'm also Certified Personal Trainer so if you want some specific info on exercises/stretches for this, just PM me and I can get you more info!)

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  • I make sure to get up and move frequently. Like, take a walk, stretch, just do anything other than sit. At least once an hour and it'll make a world of difference.

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  • If it is really an issue for you, you might look into standing/hybrid desk. It is hard to hunch when you are standing. I am personally way to lazy to do that, but it works for some people.

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  • I really wanted to get one for the office but we already have a desk here.  It's a little silly for my company to invest money into something that's fixable with some common practices.  I went out today and got some monitor stands and I will be replacing my chair with an exercise ball.

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  • stand up desk.

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  • You will really sit on an exercise ball... you will get tired of it real quick lol!

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  • Personal experience... a couple of months after taking on a permanent job as IT (IT Dept previously non-existent) I asked management to get me a proper adjustable chair, a right hight desk to sit at (that my feet actually fit under) and I propped my monitor up on a box so that it is nearly eye level. Sitting with correct posture (diagram on first reply) is not necessarily the most spontaneously comfortable way to sit... but if you're sitting for extended periods of time it will keep you well in the long run ;)

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  • Also you may find this helpful :P

    http://www.theonion.com/video/more-office-workers-switching-to-fetal-position-de-36240

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  • I heard it helps tone your core muscles and correct posture as long as you sit on and off of that and an office chair.  At this point I'm desperate to try anything that works before I have permanent complications when I'm older.

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  • I use a monitor stand that places the center of the monitors at eye's level, along with a good chair. 

    http://www.ergotron.com/ProductsDetails/tabid/65/PRDID/127/language/en-CA/Default.aspx

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  • Don't ignore this. My body's pretty strong and adaptable, so I tend to abuse it a bit. About a month ago I went to roll out of bed and suddenly my World became pain. My lower back had 'adjusted' and compressed the Sciatic nerve. Physio is making it better, and then I'll start exercising (had done NOTHING over the cold, snowy Winter we just had, and ate poorly so gained weight...) Not sure it'll ever feel the same...

    You don't know what you've got in your health until it's gone. Address this ASAP, especially if it's only been weeks? I'm talking about YEARS in my case...

    I also just noticed HOW you said you're hurting. Try to force your shoulders back to 90 degrees as often as you can (don't hunch forward). The best thing you can do right now is pull your chair in closer to your keyboard. You're probably sitting back away from it and leaning forward to type...

    Spice (5) flagReport
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  • You need to stretch more. The link below helped fix my posture.

    http://kaasplateau.com/stretches.pdf

    Spice (7) flagReport
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  • I've done the stand up desk and have gone back down to a good desk chair, I have added a lumbar support cushion on my aeron to help remind me to sit up straight.

    Getting up for a stroll is critical though, get out of your desk!

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  • try working on core and back muscles at the gym, and get your desk setup according to the diagram others have posted 

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  • Start doing some exercises that help stretch out your shoulders/back and also as others have said, work on your core. Strength training will help you a TON. I had REALLY bad posture when I was in High School/early college and I had this back/chest strap device with little magnets on the back that lined my spine. I wore that while I was at home or especially sitting at my desk and it helped a lot. It physically and mentally forced me to have better posture.

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  • A good massage from an LMT periodically will also help keep your muscles loose.  And it feels darn good, too.  And no, I'm not talking about "those" kind of massages...

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  • I love these posts about exercising at the gym, come on, IT doesn't have time for the gym!

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  • I love these things!

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  • Exercise ball works great if you have enough space in your office to switch between that and a regular chair. 

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  • Ordered this the other day and it has been a life saver. Less than $5.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BISJQAS/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Also recommend a standing/sitting desk with a foam foot pad while you're standing. Done wonders for my lower back.

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  • 1. Monitor setup

    2. Don't sit for too long. Walk around a bit every hour or two, and think about good posture when walking and sitting.

    3. Exercises that help like face pulls

    4. Stretches that help, or yoga in general

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  • Troy Jollimore wrote:

    Don't ignore this. My body's pretty strong and adaptable, so I tend to abuse it a bit. About a month ago I went to roll out of bed and suddenly my World became pain. My lower back had 'adjusted' and compressed the Sciatic nerve. Physio is making it better, and then I'll start exercising (had done NOTHING over the cold, snowy Winter we just had, and ate poorly so gained weight...) Not sure it'll ever feel the same...

    You don't know what you've got in your health until it's gone. Address this ASAP, especially if it's only been weeks? I'm talking about YEARS in my case...

    I also just noticed HOW you said you're hurting. Try to force your shoulders back to 90 degrees as often as you can (don't hunch forward). The best thing you can do right now is pull your chair in closer to your keyboard. You're probably sitting back away from it and leaning forward to type...

    I triggered my sciatic pain one time when I sneezed.  Worst pain I ever felt in my life and I have a high pain tolerance.  I had this pain for the next 4 months until I could get into physical therapy.  I would not wish this on my worst enemy.
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  • Yes, 

    you seriously get time?

    Twice a week?? :)

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  • lkm0513 wrote:

    I triggered my sciatic pain one time when I sneezed.  Worst pain I ever felt in my life and I have a high pain tolerance.  I had this pain for the next 4 months until I could get into physical therapy.  I would not wish this on my worst enemy.
    Same here for tolerance. I've felt 'worse' pain before (and know of others that would probably be WAY worse, like Achilles tears or kidney stones... *Shudder*) Physio has 'changed' it from an electric shock going through my leg, to my one leg feeling like it's clamped in a vice, to mild muscular and lower back pain. HOPING it will go away within the next month or so, but I know people that are crippled by it, or similar symptoms.
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  • Standing more often throughout the day will help. If you can't get a standing desk then repurpose an old laptop and try and stand somewhere using that for an hour or two a day. Your job can't keep you tied to one desk/ machine 100% of the time surely..

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  • Any advice for a person too short to sit normally in a "normal" office chair? I can not achieve all the things recommended due to being too short to touch both the floor and the back of my chair at the same time. 

    I suffer pretty seriously, been sore in the neck and shoulders 24/7 since I started this job (in March). Rhomboid and trap stretches help after the fact, but I haven't been able to get back to 100%. Would like to *prevent* this pain, too, not just band-aid it.

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  • YogA~~ do it bro.....dont care what they say.....also all about the chair .....did I mention the chair? ohh and yeah the chair....... i always get up to see mu users when I can....... not remote into everything....not all IT peeps are like soutpark makes them.....

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  • Eismc2 wrote:

    Any advice for a person too short to sit normally in a "normal" office chair? I can not achieve all the things recommended due to being too short to touch both the floor and the back of my chair at the same time. 

    I suffer pretty seriously, been sore in the neck and shoulders 24/7 since I started this job (in March). Rhomboid and trap stretches help after the fact, but I haven't been able to get back to 100%. Would like to *prevent* this pain, too, not just band-aid it.

    I would recommend a standing desk to your height requirements.  My boss has one.  Loves it.  (He also tends to dance a little as he works now.  Kinda weird. lol)

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  • Don't lean back, sit on the front edge of the seat, and ensure that the level of the seat keeps your knees bent at a 90 degree angle with your feet flat on the ground.  You need to build up the strength of the lower back supinators.  If you find this difficult you might want to invest in a kneeling posture chair.

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  • If you are hurting from not having a proper work environment then you my want to look into speaking to your employer about getting furniture that will fit you properly. It either comes down to this or they may have an issue with workman's comp due to the injuries you will receive. From what I understand they must make an effort to correct this. I know at my last 2 employers we had to do this many times. We had people too big for a standard desk and people too small for a standard desk. We even had a person with very bad eye sight that required a much larger monitor and a magnifier to allow  them to work comfortably.

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  • Eismc2 wrote:

    Any advice for a person too short to sit normally in a "normal" office chair? I can not achieve all the things recommended due to being too short to touch both the floor and the back of my chair at the same time. 

    I suffer pretty seriously, been sore in the neck and shoulders 24/7 since I started this job (in March). Rhomboid and trap stretches help after the fact, but I haven't been able to get back to 100%. Would like to *prevent* this pain, too, not just band-aid it.

    Get a small box or stool for your feet to rest on.

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  • I have a foot rest under my desk, and I tend to find myself leaning more back then forward. I do however spend 5-6 days in the gym, lifting weights. I lift back at least 2 days a week to keep myself from being sore or having back problems. I also throw in some cardio to keep as lean as possible.

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  • Liz T (Spiceworks) wrote:

    Get a small box or stool for your feet to rest on.

    We are not allowed to have a box or stool at or around our feet because it is considered a tripping hazard.

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  • Don't get a chair that leans back, I spend my day laying back like a pimp in front of my station. I'm super tall (6'5) and I enjoy this leaning back, takes the pressure off my back but really screws my posture for walking. Just today I was becoming self aware of my Notre Dame esqe posture

    Here is a picture for an idea (just imagine a computer in the lap):

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  • I had this same issue at a previous job, and found that a foot rest fixed it completely.  It caused me to sit back in my chair instead of hunching forward, and relieved all the pain in my back and hips.

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  • Don't discount going to a good chiropractor. I used to feel amazing after being under care for a few weeks.

    Then I started having to pay out of pocket and stopped.

    Don't mean a back-cracker either, mine was a holistic version, gentle but still got those bones moving.

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  • FDUb wrote:

    YogA~~ do it bro.....dont care what they say.....also all about the chair .....did I mention the chair? ohh and yeah the chair....... i always get up to see mu users when I can....... not remote into everything....not all IT peeps are like soutpark makes them.....

    I am!

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  • Ohh Man~~~~LOL......i though I saw you on here

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  • Eismc2 wrote:

    Any advice for a person too short to sit normally in a "normal" office chair? I can not achieve all the things recommended due to being too short to touch both the floor and the back of my chair at the same time. 

    I suffer pretty seriously, been sore in the neck and shoulders 24/7 since I started this job (in March). Rhomboid and trap stretches help after the fact, but I haven't been able to get back to 100%. Would like to *prevent* this pain, too, not just band-aid it.

    Focus on your back, stay close to the keyboard so your shoulders are as square as you can get them... and I think xEODGuy nailed it with his mention of a footrest. Otherwise the backs of your legs will start to hurt from the constant pressure of the chair cushion.
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  • @Probe - where'd you get this diagram? Thank you!!!

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  • I prefer my ergonomics a lil more lax...


    Sorry, couldn't resist : )
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  • Dang, ya beat me too it! haha

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