Home
Join

24 Replies

  • CCNA > JNCIA , just for the main fact that most employers know Cisco but not necessary Juniper.

    if you just want to learn for the heck of it, get BOTH

    https://learningportal.juniper.net/juniper/user_activity_info.aspx?id=11478Opens a new window

    Every now and then Juniper has the  JNCIA for free.

    I don't like the 'CompTIA' trio

    I'd not get the A+ unless you have no experience period. Then I'd skip the Net+ for CCNA.

    Sec+ is fine 

    Pepper graySpice (14) flagReport
    3 found this helpful thumb_up thumb_down
  • EliteHuskarl wrote:

     My company offers financial incentives for some networking certs but with the catch that you agree to stay for >12 months following certification

    Main reason I never used employer support for stuff, I don't want to lock myself in or having to pay it back.

    Pepper graySpice (5) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Neally wrote:

    CCNA > JNCIA , just for the main fact that most employers know Cisco but not necessary Juniper.

    if you just want to learn for the heck of it, get BOTH

    https://learningportal.juniper.net/juniper/user_activity_info.aspx?id=11478Opens a new window

    Every now and then Juniper has the  JNCIA for free.

    I don't like the 'CompTIA' trio

    I'd not get the A+ unless you have no experience period. Then I'd skip the Net+ for CCNA.

    Sec+ is fine 

    I appreciate these insights... but, as you might have noticed, I already got my A+, so it's kind of a moot point. "No experience period" applied to me pretty well until recently, so I feel that it was a good investment of time and energy.

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I'm more-than-less in Neally​ 's camp (full disclosure I did get the Trio, but due to school reqs), since you've already A+'d that's fine... I would say stop Net+ and go straight into CCNA, but if you insist on Net+  it should act as a good springboard for CCNA. Experience and projects are probably going to help you more than focusing on Certs. There's way too many certs, so unless you see a job that really requires it, maybe slow down on that. But Sec+ is good if you want to get into Gov work, it's usually the minimum wanted, then you'll need a domain specific cert, ie Cloud, Server, or whatever.

    at any rate, good luck.

    • local_offer Tagged Items
    • Tag by NeallyNeally
    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Atom60m6 wrote:

    I'm more-than-less in Neally​ 's camp (full disclosure I did get the Trio, but due to school reqs), since you've already A+'d that's fine... I would say stop Net+ and go straight into CCNA, but if you insist on Net+  it should act as a good springboard for CCNA. Experience and projects are probably going to help you more than focusing on Certs. There's way too many certs, so unless you see a job that really requires it, maybe slow down on that. But Sec+ is good if you want to get into Gov work, it's usually the minimum wanted, then you'll need a domain specific cert, ie Cloud, Server, or whatever.

    at any rate, good luck.

    So this is a really good point and one that I'm on board with as a general principle. The reason I'm pursuing the Net+ is that, because of my lack of prior experience, this material is not just factually new, but also conceptually new. I'm finding the Net+ really helpful in breaking up the sod, so to speak, and introducing my brain to concepts at the most basic level. So yes, I agree with all of the CompTIA naysayers who say it won't do much for my career. I agree that it won't do so directly. But I think it will indirectly by helping me learn. If I were to try for the CCNA now, I think I would become overwhelmed and discouraged by the "newness" of the material. Because I'm starting a new career mid-life, with a family and a good deal of flux in my life circumstances, my study time can be somewhat limited and it's nice to have goals that are achievable in a relatively short time frame. Net+ meets that bill, and at the end of this short chunk of time I'll have something to show for it, rather than "oh yeah I'm probably 30% ready for the CCNA, I think". Meanwhile, I'm getting real-life experience with some basic Juniper, Cisco, and Adva commands and mechanics to provide additional help.

    Circling back to what I stated in the OP, this is why I'm considering JNCIA first - because it might be doable in a relatively short amount of time, might help me gear up mentally for a taller challenge like the CCNA, and could also provide the financial boost of my company's incentive program. After that, maybe the CCNA wouldn't seem so intimidating.

    But maybe those are in fact weak arguments, and maybe I should take the plunge and go straight from Net+ to CCNA, which, as I read the comments that have come in so far, is not too far from what both of you are recommending.

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  •  If I were to try for the CCNA now, I think I would become overwhelmed and discouraged by the "newness" of the material.

    The CCNA was introduced in 1998 ?

    Networking did not change a whole lot since, at least on a CCNA fundamental level.

    Both Net+ and CCNA had many updates during the years.

    If you feel it helps you, you do you. I just approach it like, why aim low, I pay for certs and stuff out of pocket so I usually try to take certs of 'better' value.
    If you just want to learn, nothing wrong with getting either. Just the CCNA is the better  'bang for buck' in the job market.


    https://pauljerimy.com/security-certification-roadmap/Opens a new window

    Pepper graySpice (3) flagReport
    1 found this helpful thumb_up thumb_down
  • Neally​ thanks for these helpful insights.

    For someone totally new to networking (imagine being at the level where most of the material for the Net+ is quite new), how challenging is the CCNA?

    • local_offer Tagged Items
    • Tag by NeallyNeally
    Pepper graySpice (3) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • EliteHuskarl wrote:

    Neally​ thanks for these helpful insights.

    For someone totally new to networking (imagine being at the level where most of the material for the Net+ is quite new), how challenging is the CCNA?

    I took it 3 times during the years.... (let it expire never thought I'd need it again and well I thought wrong lol)

    IDK I would say it is challenging as there is a ton to learn, then again it's not much harder than the Net+ as that as well is about the networking basis.

    Sign up for the netacad and get the package tracer (basically a network simulator)

    https://www.netacad.com/courses/packet-tracerOpens a new window

    https://skillsforall.com/resources/lab-downloadsOpens a new window

    https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/s/ccna-exam-topics?ccid=ccna&dtid=website&oid=cdc-ccna-exa...Opens a new window

    Ask if you have specific questions.

    Pepper graySpice (4) flagReport
    1 found this helpful thumb_up thumb_down
  • Yep, like Neally​ said, there's not really a wide gap in difficulty between Net+ and CCNA. But learning anything the first time around, you don't know what's really most important and what's not. So definitely start augmenting your learning w/ the Packet Tracer, or use GNS3 https://docs.gns3.com/docs/Opens a new window 

    There are a ton of support/tutorial sites for either CCNA or Net+.

    • local_offer Tagged Items
    • Tag by NeallyNeally
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • My personal thought is go with the cert that is going to be more helpful for you in your current role. JNCIA seems like a no brainer especially since its free. You can get your CCNA down the road if you even need to. Experience trumps certs imo.

    Pepper graySpice (4) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  •  I am over 15 years into my career and have never seen a Juniper network device, just sayin as your experience will be different than mine by necessity. 

    I would only go for those certs if you plan to be working with Cisco \ Juniper equipment on a daily basis.  I have seen lots of Cisco gear.  However my comment on the Cisco gear is that unless you are doing the programing on a near daily basis the information doesn't stick in the head and becomes lost effort.  

    Hence my comment on only doing the certs if you plan to be working with the related tech on a near daily basis.  Taking a cert is good, but only if you practice practice practice the knowledge to glue it into your brain. I have hired too many people with CCNA certs who don't know a single thing about Cisco when asked to do a real world task.

    Pepper graySpice (3) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Not a single mention of the fact that the CCNA can be broken into two parts (ICND1 and ICND2)? If you start with the CCENT (ICND1) the coursework is a bit more involved than the Net+ but less daunting than the full CCNA test. After earning the CCENT, you can opt for the second test and walk away with your CCNA. The only downside to this is you have to pay for 2 tests.

    Pepper graySpice (2) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Juniper, here's my thoughts why.

    -  Have some significant family/personal commitments over the next couple of months.  

    Don't trade work for family.  You work FOR family, community, betterment of society.

    - 80% Juniper, 20% Cisco.  Juniper cert is easier "according to you"

    Juniper instantly makes you more valuable to your company.  Do you appreciate your company and see yourself their for 1 year?

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • itaintbroke wrote:

    Not a single mention of the fact that the CCNA can be broken into two parts (ICND1 and ICND2)? If you start with the CCENT (ICND1) the coursework is a bit more involved than the Net+ but less daunting than the full CCNA test. After earning the CCENT, you can opt for the second test and walk away with your CCNA. The only downside to this is you have to pay for 2 tests.

    that's no longer the case and outdated.

    https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/training-events/training-certifications/certifications/associate/ccna....Opens a new window

    https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/training-events/training-certifications/exams/current-list/ccna-200-30...Opens a new window

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    2 found this helpful thumb_up thumb_down
  • Neally wrote:

    itaintbroke wrote:

    Not a single mention of the fact that the CCNA can be broken into two parts (ICND1 and ICND2)? If you start with the CCENT (ICND1) the coursework is a bit more involved than the Net+ but less daunting than the full CCNA test. After earning the CCENT, you can opt for the second test and walk away with your CCNA. The only downside to this is you have to pay for 2 tests.

    that's no longer the case and outdated.

    https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/training-events/training-certifications/certifications/associate/ccna....Opens a new window

    https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/training-events/training-certifications/exams/current-list/ccna-200-30...Opens a new window

    That would explain why nobody mentioned it. Thanks for dragging me into this decade. 

    Pepper graySpice (5) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I would say CCNA makes more sense if you plan to broaden your horizons and move to a different organization, whether now or in the future.  If you plan to stay at your current organization and hope to move up, going with the Juniper certs should help you build yourself up to climb a little more up the ladder.  Everyone's experience and requirements are different; follow through with what you want to do and go from there.

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    1 found this helpful thumb_up thumb_down
  • Neally wrote:

    EliteHuskarl wrote:

     My company offers financial incentives for some networking certs but with the catch that you agree to stay for >12 months following certification

    Main reason I never used employer support for stuff, I don't want to lock myself in or having to pay it back.

    I mean I get it, but the VMware VCP-DCV in person class I took cost $5,500. Needless to say I was pretty happy it was my employer footing the bill and not me! 

    Pepper graySpice (2) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • CrimsonKidA wrote:

    Neally wrote:

    EliteHuskarl wrote:

     My company offers financial incentives for some networking certs but with the catch that you agree to stay for >12 months following certification

    Main reason I never used employer support for stuff, I don't want to lock myself in or having to pay it back.

    I mean I get it, but the VMware VCP-DCV in person class I took cost $5,500. Needless to say I was pretty happy it was my employer footing the bill and not me! 

    Took a community college class for it, was like $300. 
    work smart not hard lol

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Juniper is considered niche. If you were getting the cert for a Juniper shop then that'd make sense, as a general cert for job seeking you should go Cisco.

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • EliteHuskarl​ -- I would say, in your case you can make a pretty good case for the JNCIA cert. Just go for that for now. The Net+ and the JNCIA work should help you prepare for the CCNA. But I think there is a case to be made for getting it down the line (as most of the respondents here have provided evidence for).

    The thing is, there are lots of good IT pros out there who either don't have any, or don't have much in the way of certifications. So everyone is going to have a differing opinion on certs themselves, and then the quality of the certs based on market paradigms as well as their own personal views depending on their experiences preparing for and obtaining the certs.

    I do think, as a rule of thumb, going for the Cisco certs makes far more sense than Juniper certs...but if you don't have any plans to leave your current position in the near future, you seem to have answered your own question in terms of the best path for *you* to take at the moment.

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I have taken both JNCIA and JNCIS. I would recommend JNCIA, as it is an easy pass and would require less prep than a CCNA. Plus, Juniper > Cisco all day...lol. I don't think the CompTIA exams you have taken will really be applicable. The test is mostly becoming familiar with JUNOS in general. I do believe there is a bit of subnetting on the test, but nothing crazy. 

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • EliteHuskarl wrote:

    Neally​ thanks for these helpful insights.

    For someone totally new to networking (imagine being at the level where most of the material for the Net+ is quite new), how challenging is the CCNA?

    I took mine too many years ago, but my recollection is that it wasn't challenging in the difficulty level, because the training material starts from very basic. I was a newbie too when I did, and I passed first try. It was challenging in the amount of material, that takes some time.

    I'll echo what others said:

    - if you don't plan on using this stuff on a frequent basis, most of what you learn will vanish. 

    - I'd choose the most useful to you and only you know what that is. If you are planning on staying at your current employer, do Juniper. If you are planning on leaving in a year or two, do Cisco.

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • EliteHuskarl wrote:

    This presumes that my next step is another networking cert. I could, instead, decide to go for a Sec+ and complete the "Beginner's Trio", or earn an entry-level AWS cert - but, for the purpose of this thread, I'd like to restrict the parameters to networking certs. Looking forward to hearing what my fellow Spiceheads think.

    Hey OP - In terms of networking learning paths, I did want to mention that AWS does a path available that you can investigate. This set of on-demand courses will help you learn how to design and implement AWS and hybrid IT network architectures at scale. Learning Plans can also help prepare you for the AWS Certified Advanced Networking - Specialty certificationOpens a new window exam: https://explore.skillbuilder.aws/learn/public/learning_plan/view/89/networking-learning-plan?la=cta&...Opens a new window


    Just in case! Hope that helps.


    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • There's two competing ideas here - What's useful immediately, and what's useful later on. There may be a balance, but only you will know it, we can't make that evaluation for you. 

    If your plan is to cert and move, pay for your own certs. Heck, pay for your own certs unless they don't add strings to it. You are in charge of where your career goes. It took me years to come to this realization as I waited for my employer to pay to get me certed. They never would because I would always learn enough practical skills to do the job. Once I could do the job, they didn't need to spend the money.

    They'd pay for a class here and there, but it wasn't until I really came to terms that I was in charge of me, and I needed to make this happen did I go and get my first real cert. I recommend spending some time mapping out a plan past your CCNA to make sure your short term goals are in line with your long term goals.

    It's been my experience that certing is a good way to have an overview of the subject, but you'll typically only use a subset of that knowledge unless you work for multiple clients with varied enterprises. So, in my mind, Certs are for resumes, and practical skills are to stay employed.  

    With that in mind, I'd be looking at the jobs I want, and see what certs gets me past HR into an interview. I would then while I was training to cert, make sure I had the practical skills necessary to not be a paper tiger. 

    I have had good luck in going to the boss and mentioning my plan to cert, and ask them which ones would be of good use to them. They are much more likely to spring for training materials that they can hold onto than paying for classes. And, if you have ready access to a good bit of equipment, he may let you build a lab and study while at work. THIS is kind of a raise in itself. Your mileage may vary.  

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down

Read these next...

  • Simple command to monitor Windows 10 temperature?

    Simple command to monitor Windows 10 temperature?

    Hardware

    I feel like this has probably been address before, although I was wondering if someone is aware of a simple command I can run to report the internal temperature of a Windows 10 PC?I think all computers monitor the temperature, although I've only found thi...

  • Remote access to DVR?

    Remote access to DVR?

    Security

    Hi!I have an older Hikvision DVR that I need to provide remote access to. The users would be mainly accessing it from their smartphones. I tested their software, iVMS, by assigning one of my public IP's to the DVR and it worked fine. However the issue is ...

  • Snap! -- Survival Kits, Forest Bubble on Mars, AI Movie Plots, Leprosy & Livers

    Snap! -- Survival Kits, Forest Bubble on Mars, AI Movie Plots, Leprosy & Livers

    Spiceworks Originals

    Your daily dose of tech news, in brief. Welcome to the Snap! Flashback: Back on December 6, 1907, Mathematical Logician J. Barkley Rosser Born (Read more HERE.) Bonus Flashback: Back on December 6, 1998, International Space Station assemb...

  • Spark! Pro Series - 6 December 2022

    Spark! Pro Series - 6 December 2022

    Spiceworks Originals

    Today in History: 6 December 1240 – Mongols led by Batu Khan occupy and destroy Kyiv after an 8 day siege; out of 50,000 people in the city only 2,000 survive 1849 – Harriet Tubman escapes from slavery in Maryl...

  • The most boring but interesting Phishing Attempt I've seen

    The most boring but interesting Phishing Attempt I've seen

    Security

    Hello There,We've recently had a phishy email come through to one of our employees with an attachment to something work related. But here's the interesting part: The email was spoofed. When checked, the address was that of our own domain, however the emai...