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  • There's needs to be some more choices:

    • My boss is making me go to the cloud.
    • I'd LIKE to go to the cloud but can't.
    • Some of my services are in the cloud.
    • I lose sleep because of the cloud.
    • What's this "cloud" of which you speak?
    Pepper graySpice (9) flagReport
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  • Hehe, thanks for the giggle. Love IT Pro replies like this.

    Yes, it's a complicated situation, isn't it?

    Pepper graySpice (2) flagReport
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  • I view cloud services as:

    1. Generally very useful.

    2. Generally very overpriced.

    3. Generally very difficult to accurately budget for.

    4. Generally technical support is overpriced or non-existent.

    Pepper graySpice (8) flagReport
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  • I feel like both choices apply for me ... especially depending on the context of what is being done. If the environment in question had some really strict requirements as far as how data could be transmitted and stored, I'd probably not recommend any cloud services in those cases. With a lot of other things I'd be just fine using clouded services, possibly even recommending them to their on-site counterparts.

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
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  • I often (for employment reasons) have to recommend sundry cloud solutions to our customers. I don't like the idea of storing my data on someone else's computer. Almost unavoidable for many businesses these days. And based on business case, it is actually the best option for many companies.

    That said, I still don't like it. The snags we have run into, including cost overruns and shifting goals (due to customer change requests mostly), etc. Brings to mind several quotes from "Clear and PResent Danger"

    • "The course of action I'd suggest is a course of action I can't suggest."
    • Jack Ryan: "How much?"

      Helicopter owner: "Two million dollars."

      Jack Ryan: "Uh, my pilot and I will have to take it for a test drive."

      Helicopter owner: "Of course, you just have to leave a deposit."

      Jack Ryan: "How much is that?"

      Helicopter owner: "Two million dollars."
    • Jack Ryan: "Who authorized this?"

      Ritter: "I'm sure they'll ask you that."

      Jack Ryan: "Who authorized it?"

      Ritter: "I have no recollection..."

    Pepper graySpice (2) flagReport
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  • I use cloud on a daily basis from my personal devices so I'm all for it. I think its super helpful and necessary now a days.

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
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  • AgentOfPork wrote:

    I often (for employment reasons) have to recommend sundry cloud solutions to our customers. I don't like the idea of storing my data on someone else's computer. Almost unavoidable for many businesses these days. And based on business case, it is actually the best option for many companies.

    That said, I still don't like it. The snags we have run into, including cost overruns and shifting goals (due to customer change requests mostly), etc. Brings to mind several quotes from "Clear and PResent Danger"

    • "The course of action I'd suggest is a course of action I can't suggest."
    • Jack Ryan: "How much?"

      Helicopter owner: "Two million dollars."

      Jack Ryan: "Uh, my pilot and I will have to take it for a test drive."

      Helicopter owner: "Of course, you just have to leave a deposit."

      Jack Ryan: "How much is that?"

      Helicopter owner: "Two million dollars."
    • Jack Ryan: "Who authorized this?"

      Ritter: "I'm sure they'll ask you that."

      Jack Ryan: "Who authorized it?"

      Ritter: "I have no recollection..."

    Great books!

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
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  • Aside from the core Microsoft stack that I use for my dayjob, I'll happily recommend IaaS from my provider of choice Linode, and a few simpler applications, but I'm really hesitant to recommend a lot of "cloud-native" applications and products from most vendors. 

    I think there are a few that have really good offerings that are well thought out and reasonably secure, but as with anything that's popular, there's also a lot of insecure junk out there. Especially with the number of supply-chain attacks on core libraries we've seen over the past couple of years, I usually don't think the risks are worth the benefits against self-hosting a traditional service, especially in some of the sectors we participate in which have high security requirements.

    • local_offer Tagged Items
    • Tag by LinodeLinodestar4.9
    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
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  • How do I view the cloud? I think Johnnie said it best.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gNVj-U38i0Opens a new window

    Pepper graySpice (2) flagReport
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  • Robert5205 wrote:

    How do I view the cloud? I think Johnnie said it best.

    🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣 AMEN!

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  • On premise or go away lol

    Pepper graySpice (2) flagReport
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  • When it is the appropriate tool for the job, sure... I'm happy to use cloud technologies.

    Personally I do not store much data in anyone's cloud and generally steer clear of monthly software subscriptions. Perpetual licensed products I bought a few years or longer ago still work fine for my needs.

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  • I always switch 'cloud' with 'someone else's computer' and usually people understand it a bit better. Regardless what someone chooses, you should know at least a little of both to make your decision. 

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
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  • For my current job we'll go cloud if it makes sense if the cost is beneficial and if we need flexibility when it comes to scalability. It also depends highly on the use case of the application or service. If only onsite employees need it, then it's likely going to our datacenter. If accessibility is needed anywhere, then we'll likely go the cloud route. We also look at how much control we need or security for the service. If we want 100% control, it's going to the datacenter. Very case by case basis currently. My last employer through everything cloud and it was a steep learning curve and cost was insane after everything was moved there.

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  • If you are just putting a bunch of VMs in the cloud, basically just modeling a traditional data center, you're doing it wrong.

    I also love the phrase "it's just someone else's computer" because when someone tells me that, it's clear they have zero clue what the cloud actually is (more specifically, public cloud, which is really what we're usually talking about by saying "the cloud").

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
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  • You know, whether we like it or not, the age of having a server closet for every company is drawing to a close.  Within 20 years, every firm will have some, if not all, of its digital assets in the cloud.  There are simply too many good reasons to do this.  It'll be an office full of desktops and laptops, with a pipe to a hyperscalar.  Unless you work at a datacenter, there won't be a lot of hardware to take care of. 

    On the plus side, that means a lot of our cabling/cooling/etc. work will be virtual and can be done from our own desktops :). 

      T

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  • I can se how "the cloud" can be handy in some circumstances, but generally speaking, I don't like it and have a preference for on premise, which I can control. 
    I am not against a private cloud from a hosting provider, but public cloud, no I hate it.

    A good example is when we switched from an older on premise Exchange environment to Office 365. Before the change, we never had any issues of people trying to hack into our mailboxes and send out all sorts of weird spam as us, when we changed to Office 365 it didn't take long for that to start happening. 

    Personally, I wouldn't store my own data on the public cloud or in E-Mail accounts. I just don't like relinquishing control over it. 
    If I want to back something up and/or store something for a long period of time, I go for optical media (CD-R/DVD-R). 
    Unless you are scratching the discs to pieces or storing them in direct sunlight, they can't go wrong.

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  • What do you mean by "cloud"? Which level of xaaS?

    Software as a Service? I think we're all OK with that.

    Infrastructure as a service? You pays your money, you takes your choice.

    Disaster Recovery as a service? Beneficial.

    Other aaSes? Down to business requirements.  The concept that everyone can put 100% of their infrastructure into the cloud is misguided.

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
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  • SaaS - Sometimes you really can't avoid it, but other than that it's just "someone else's computer" and we wont go there until we are forced to.

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  • In my opinion, cloud services are overrated and over priced. For most of them, you are just paying for someone else hard drive. Some services make sense to be on the cloud. Others, not so much. With data on the cloud, you lose control of data, you are forced to use the same version of the software as everybody else. And if you thought the cloud was reliable, you are wrong. Most cloud service companies depend on the big cloud companies, and if the hosts go down, the service goes down.

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  • Seems like a lot of software vendors have been moving their offerings to cloud-hosted instead of on-premise with the promise of "the cloud's" high availability, which is a true benefit. But it also makes me chuckle when that vendor's offering goes offline due to a single datacenter power outage. Were your customers not worth adding a second availability zone? Or did you just not know?

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  • Another consideration for cloud use is that sometimes the location of the cloud servers actually matter. One of my clients is an international firm, and data retention regulations can be at play here, especially in Europe. My client has, at least on one occasion, had to move massive amounts of data to on-prem because of these laws. 

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  • The altostratus is my go to cloud.

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  • Cloud should be renamed Smoke. Where there is smoke there's fire, you're just burning money.

    Cloud is good for unreliable application workloads where you can have worker clones that can span VMs, hosts, datacenters, regions. Heards of cattle of VMs. You can spin up more VMs to handle loads, throw them in different data centers for reliability, service different regions.

    If you don't have herds of cattle VMs and your CPU core count is pretty static and predictable, on prem has been the way to go. This is where we are, very sacred prized cow VMs. Discrete jobs, you get chocolate milk from Bessie, get strawberry milk from Elsie. That over there is the 40 year old almond tree, we don't talk about how that works and just pray it never snaps a big branch taking down the whole ERP.

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  • Your two choices are too polarized to allow me to vote. The first two replies summed it up best.

    We are hybrid here, though not everyone would see it at first glance. Some items are too expensive to move to the "cloud" for us. Some items can't be moved to the cloud because a cloud option does not exist (and wouldn't work as well if it did).

    Some items are both on-prem and cloud-based.

    Some items are only cloud-based.

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  • Sales people will get you to the cloud with silver tongued promises and cheap intro rates and promises of flying in people to help migrate you. Then once you've signed the contract or migrated, and there's no (easy) going back.... here comes the yearly support increase, license increase, inflation increase... 

    Just look at Verizon 17-20 billion net revenue... that's profit after expenses...yet they still have to incur a $2.20/line "Economic Adjustment Charge"

    The amount of businesses moving to the monthly subscription model companies are moving towards is also gross.

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  • Mathew8414 wrote:

    [ ... ]

    If I want to back something up and/or store something for a long period of time, I go for optical media (CD-R/DVD-R). 
    Unless you are scratching the discs to pieces or storing them in direct sunlight, they can't go wrong.

    M-Disc concept for 1,000 years of storage was nice, except... The capacity. Sony experiments with a "drums" of a few multi-TB discs "glued" together into a single unified "medium" now to have bigger capacity, but these are pennies compared to the typical workload sizes.

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  • I'm seeing a great deal of misunderstanding about what is and isn't available in the cloud.  And when I refer to "the cloud", I mean the big players like Azure, AWS, GCP, etc.

    * You never lose control of your data, only of the hardware and physical environment in which it sits.  That becomes the responsibility of the cloud provider, who contractually provide SLA guarantees for their infrastructure.  On top of that, their security is best-of-breed and very few firms can compete with them on that level.

    * They can appear expensive, yes - but, you need to take into account a few factors that result in hidden costs of on-prem units.  Electricity, cooling, real estate, maintenance staff, support contracts, hosting software, all these combine to make a normal box-in-the-closet rather expensive.  Top that off with the cloud monthlies going onto the "Operating Expense" line in your accountant's ledger rather than "Capital Expense".  That ends up with some significant tax advantages.  

    * Also on the note of the expense side - flexibility to scale in and out as needed.  For example, let's say your favorite number-cruncher generally has a hefty workload during the last three days of the month for payroll or sales invoicing, etc.  You can schedule your server to up-scale its CPU capacity during those three days, and back down every other day of the month.  And then you only pay for what you use.  By the same token, if you find your company is suddenly getting slammed with too much traffic, you spin up a few new web servers in a matter of minutes.  

    * Many storage costs are only paid on egress of data from the cloud.  

    * The major players among the hyperscalars offer geographical isolation of data.  If I get a storage account in Western Europe on Azure, for instance, I am guaranteed that data isn't going to leave the region.

    There's a lot more to it, and it's definitely worth reviewing in more detail.  

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  • First, I will assume that everyone here is working in a sort of remote or hybrid environment. So in such case, why are we even having this conversation? Can you be "out of the cloud" in this day and age?

    I used to resist it until my boss and coworkers wanted collaboration features that they were seeing in business partners. The requests started before Covid, but once Covid hit it wasn't a choice anymore. How is it a choice for you? If you have remote or hybrid workers, or collaborate with business partners, the old model of "all on-prem, everyone behind our firewall, use VPN in the rare instances in which you are away, save and BU all data on prem", is just not feasible. 

    What am I missing?

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  • All of us will end up running in the cloud mostly or entirely sooner or later. I am currently struggling to postpone that moment as much as I can.

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  • I've relicensed two software platforms to on-prem versions, and licensed the on-prem version of two more, in the  last month. 

    Turns out the DoD don't think the average cloud provider is secure enough for the DIB to do business with. Think about that.

    Less than 300 cloud service providers are currently on the FedRAMP Moderate list, including our endpoint security vendor - SentinelOne. Our IT group password manager, Keeper Security - check! That's it. 

    Supaplex wrote:

    All of us will end up running in the cloud mostly or entirely sooner or later. I am currently struggling to postpone that moment as much as I can.

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