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  • A lot of decision makers have no idea whatsoever that CALs may be needed when they purchase a server OS.

    A lot of decision makers hunt down the best price and often end up buying counterfeit software.  Some probably suspect it's bogus, many have no idea.

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  • Da_Schmoo wrote:

    A lot of decision makers have no idea whatsoever that CALs may be needed when they purchase a server OS.

    A lot of decision makers hunt down the best price and often end up buying counterfeit software.  Some probably suspect it's bogus, many have no idea.

    Ah yes! Especially the counterfeit software. 

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  • I may be dating myself here, but OEM software upgrades using retail products. When I started at my last job, we had retail versions of Office 2003 Standard upgrades, with just a handful of OEM Office XP Standard discs. We would just use one of those discs as evidence of upgrade.

    Fortunately, we were able to get it all squared away before the first SAM audit. It was still quite the hassle as we were just using OEM Office software at the time (2010 and 2013). Once we moved to Office 365 things got much easier in the licensing front :)

    I also ran into an issue with another audit where a turnkey solution was provided under lease, but there were no product key cards for the Windows Server license on it. Fun.

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  • Wouldn't it be nice if there was a website where you select how many users/computers etc etc

    And it spit out what you need to be legal/cost effective

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  • Back in the days before it was common to ship software releases and run an installer wizard ... discovering that the legacy product shipped as a full system backup image and the first step of the installation process was to to do a full restore.  The rest of the install was to running a script that asked the most basic questions for the software - such as host names, paths and file locations and admin user and password.    Did absolutely nothing to look at the system it was running on to figure out such things and make an offer as the default.    Of course since it was a full image back up the build system , it also included the company license keys.  

    The actors in this story were not actually played by Microsoft.   And it was in the days that it was much more common a client to buy the system and our software as one line item from us and the built  system was shipped to them.

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  • Hey Jim Peters,
    Right there with ya. Installing back in the day required so much user-input ya had to know the system you were installing on. Now you can install with the click of a mouse.
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