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  • Is it always the same drive that fails?

    If so, I guess you could try inserting the drives into the enclosure in a different order to see whether the problem follows the drive or stays with a specific port in the enclosure.

    It is NOT recommended to use RAID 5 with HDDs over 1TB because rebuilds will OFTEN fail. However, if your backups are in good shape this shouldn't be too big of an issue.

    I would probably test each drive individually (format them as single drives and run a surface check on them).

    Spice (2) flagReport
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  • If the HDD has a bad sector or wasn't initialized properly during imaging, then it could cause weird issues like this. Any chance to replace the drive with a known good spare?

    #IamIntel  


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  • Thank you for the feedback.

    MCEStaff​, Would changing the drive around not break the array volume?

     What other option besides RAID 5 would you suggest?

    Jack (Intel)​, unfortunately we don't have a replacement / spare and these drive are pricey just to by one to test with.

    Can you recommend software to test the drive while connecting in this server?

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  • I'm running a long test on the suspect drive with Seagate SeaTools, so hopefully that will pick any issue and then fix them. 

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  • Bax2000 wrote:

    I have having an issue with one of the drives in a Raid 5 Volume that keep dropping out of the array.
    • What's the health of that disk?
    SMART tables are disclosing some kinds of disk health issues if being the case.

    Bax2000 wrote:

    I'm running a long test on the suspect drive with Seagate SeaTools, so hopefully that will pick any issue and then fix them. 

    This is usually a good option if SMART was already indicating that disk health issues are approaching.
    When disk health issues are approaching, you may no longer want to use such a disk in a RAID array. You might want to get rid off such a device or limit its use for temporary data only.
    • What kind of issues would you hope that Seagate Technology SeaTools for Windows​ would be able to not only report but also to fix for your WD disk?
    The important part of such a tool is to find and report issues, not to fix issues. A fix might be possible only for Seagate disks. And if such fixes are available, they would probably provide only a short term temporary fix. You could expect the same issue reappear again in not so far distant future. You may expect such future to be shorter in a RAID array than in deployment as single disk outside of RAID array. So findings are an indication to look for a replacement disk of same (or larger) size. I don't know a better fix than a replacement.
    I've seen that your operating system and firmware are already a bit dated. An update of those might be available. But that seems unrelated to your current issue. You may want to check and eventually update after addressing your disk issue.

    Bax2000 wrote:

    What other option besides RAID 5 would you suggest?
    When your current RAID type selection is RAID 5, then RAID 6 would be the better choice for RAID arrays with spinning HDDs of 1 TB disk sizes and larger. RAID 6 supports up to two failed disks. RAID 6 also supports spare disks. If you have sufficient disks for RAID 5 plus spare disk, then you have sufficient disks for RAID 6 too.
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