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  • Do weekly backups and take the NAS somewhere else on the days you're not running a backup or just use a large external USB drive, take a replica/copy/backup once a week, then take that copy to another house/friends/family.

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  • spicehead-9v3jn wrote:

    But, what happens if I happen to get hit by a tornado?  I was wondering (and the whole point of this forum post), is there such a thing as a safe to put my NAS in? 

    Can you afford something like this - https://iosafe.com/products/218-nas/?

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  • I thought about using BDRs.  Home videos and pictures aren't changing or need a new backup very often.  

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  • I don't think I want to replace my NAS.  I really like the Synology NAS.  I've invested quite a bit into different services and licenses for it.  Seems like there would be something I could put it in.  I mean, I probably could go to home depot and buy a typical safe that can be bolted to the floor and then drill a hole in the back of it to get the wires through.

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  • Read it a little closer.  Those NASes are synology NASes just rebadged.  So, it's a thought.  Maybe I'll buy one of those for the garage.  Looks like there's an optional floor mount I could use to bolt it to the ground.  I don't think I need a ton of storage.  My NAS currently has two 4 TB drives in it running RAID1.  So far, the storage is more than fine.  

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  • spicehead-9v3jn wrote:

    I don't think I want to replace my NAS.  I really like the Synology NAS.  I've invested quite a bit into different services and licenses for it.  Seems like there would be something I could put it in.  I mean, I probably could go to home depot and buy a typical safe that can be bolted to the floor and then drill a hole in the back of it to get the wires through.

    If you go this route, be sure to use an intumescent seal where cords penetrate the safe wall. Intumescent seals are designed to seal off the opening when exposed to fire, so when the cord burns out it doesn't leave a hole for fire to enter the safe.

    In the event of a fire, allow sufficient time for the internal contents of the safe to safely cool before disturbing or opening the safe. I've heard stories (anecdotal evidence) of people opening hot safes, and the contents burst into flames when oxygen hits the hot material. Don't know if it's true or not.

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  • spicehead-9v3jn wrote:

    Read it a little closer.  Those NASes are synology NASes just rebadged.  So, it's a thought.  Maybe I'll buy one of those for the garage.  Looks like there's an optional floor mount I could use to bolt it to the ground.  I don't think I need a ton of storage.  My NAS currently has two 4 TB drives in it running RAID1.  So far, the storage is more than fine.  

    That's correct. For that matter, they are externally rebadged; they use the Synology native firmware that isn't customized in any way by ioSafe, so you can transfer subscriptions to the device without any problem, and register the device with Synology cloud services.

    (I have installed one ioSafe product for a client.)

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  • How much data are we talking about. Replicating to an external device in the garage is a great idea, but why stop there. I would aslo get an external USB drive/ caddy and take a 2nd copy of your data and then place that somewhere safe be it your car, a friends house etc. make sure its an encrypted disk so your friend cant plug it in and view it.

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