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  • It sounds like you may have gone into this with a bit of a change the world expectation.  You seem to have at least expected a quid pro quo.  Women have been fighting for equality since the dawn of humanity.  The end of slavery has not brought parity for the black community.  The gay population has been fighting since the 70's.  The idea that you could go in and expect parity may have been a bit unrealistic.  Please understand, I am not trying to minimize your dilemma.  In fact, I encourage you to continue the good fight.  But remember, this isn't just about you.

    Spice (9) flagReport
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  • Have you voiced these thoughts to your Diversity and Inclusion team? My company also recently started an I&D group which has regular meetings. Unfortunately I haven't had time to attend the past few, but I know if someone voiced similar concerns in ours, there would be plenty of folks who would back you on these thoughts and support your feelings here. 

    I obviously can't speak for your company, but, at least in my company's instance, the whole point of the I&D group is to get people to stand up and voice such opinions in a safe space where they won't be punished nor ridiculed for them. 

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  • I have been noticing that Diversity and Inclusion programs have been leaving the disabled groups for a while now.  They only care about the minority groups they can see (sex, gender, race etc.). If you have a disability that people can’t see it is even harder to be noticed.  Mine is one that people don’t see and I have had mine since birth.  I once volunteered and was told I did not belong on the committee.  It took for me to have a seizure in a committee for them to understand. 

    If they are only giving you one day for disabilities, they don’t understand the contributions of those with disabilities to society.  According to the last US census there were 58 million people with disabilities the largest minority group in the US.  There is over a billion people worldwide.  We have contributed to everything from the telephone to helicopter. Most of the people we hold in high regard as brilliant have disabilities, Einstein, Da Vinci, Walt Disney and many more. 

    Most of the disabled community doesn’t feel included in the workplace or higher education because people don’t know how to deal with us.  They are afraid of our intelligence or how we learn differently.  This is why most of us are in jobs that are below our abilities.  The best you can do is advocate for yourself and become a force to be reckoned with. This requires learning the policies and procedures of the company and using them. At first it is about you and your needs.  You will find that the goal will become bigger than you very quickly.  Don't let this overwhelm you.  

    Many companies view us as good for the bottom line.  They also get tax benefits for hiring people with disabilities, so they are not being totally magnanimous about it. 

    Over the years I have had people tell me I was not qualified for jobs because of my disability.  Or I am too disabled to learn a job.  The discrimination is really bad.  I spent years studying this in graduate school where I faced professors telling me I was not smart enough to be there.  But this was the one area of employment and education that has always bothered me.  This higher you go in graduate school the worse the discrimination gets. 

    I got involved with 1812ada to help change this conversation. 



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  • Hardwareguy wrote:

    Over the years I have had people tell me I was not qualified for jobs because of my disability.  Or I am too disabled to learn a job.  The discrimination is really bad.  I spent years studying this in graduate school where I faced professors telling me I was not smart enough to be there.  But this was the one area of employment and education that has always bothered me.  This higher you go in graduate school the worse the discrimination gets. 


    I semi-recently had a long "conversation" with a hiring manager on this topic... My job title is changing and the requirements they listed specifically excluded many disabilities (some of which I deal with myself.) I had to have them re-word, or change most of the requirements before I would even qualify myself (this is for the job I'm already doing, by the way)

    For instance, one of the requirements they had listed was to "be able to distinguish all colors".... As someone who's only ever been officially diagnosed as colorblind by a school nurse, this shouldn't have been a big deal, but I have a hard time with reds and blues and it really hit a nerve for me. There were others that were honestly more egregious, but this one in particular upset me because there is literally nothing about this job that involves colors. It felt like it was purely to exclude the 10% of the Male population and the 1% of Females who suffer from colorblindness for no good reason.

    This wasn't the only disability they seemed to be ignorant of. I say ignorant because I choose to believe it's ignorance and not malice in this case, as my company is generally pretty inclusive, but it was eye opening. My disabilities are all mostly invisible, and I can only imagine what folks with more visible disabilities have to deal with. 

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  • I hate that you're dealing with this disability and that your company is ignoring you.

    I've found that D&I is just companies blowing smoke and trying to look good to sell more products, bring more people in, etc. They don't actually care about their people beyond the minimal required to benefit the company, avoid legal action, etc.

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  • Each situation I mentioned was pure malice.  I had a professor in graduate school who flunked me out of program because I had the same disability as his child.  I had a professor in undergrad who refused to work with people with disabilities and a second one who called me an F****ing moron.  I had supervisors try and fire me because of it. 

    My title as well has been evolving over the years, but people continually find ways to exclude me from the promotion pool.  I have been doing the same job for years now but never get a chance for promotion. By the way a job I should not be doing in the first place because of the risk to injury.  It is a way to keep people down and out of advancing.  Making people look like a worse employee then they really are. 

    Over the years I have had more labels than what is on the side of a cheerios box.  Yet people like me are still falling through the cracks.  I have had people in HR simply walk away from me.  I have had entire disability services office walk away from me.  To the point where the only avenue is the courts. A person can only advocate for themselves so far.  

    I stopped believing that it was ignorance a long time ago.  Believing it is ignorance let’s people off the hook, especially when there are laws that they have to abide by and choose willingly not to follow them. 


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  • I feel for you, I never mention anything about PTSD or Depression that were brought on by war zone events.  I have actually lost jobs due to injuries that I incurred during my time in the service, yet the VA also denies my claims for disability.  I wish you the best in your fight.

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  • Unfortunately, people with disabilities are still often treated as third class citizens, or make people uncomfortable, or just treated as not fully human. My wife chose people with disabilities as her "underserved minority" for a class during dental school, almost nobody else (including the professor) ever thought about that as an option. The way that this company is handling it sounds like discrimination based on a protected class, as well as sharing PHI/PII information without valid cause, both of which I would try mentioning to your HR department, and possibly a lawyer if this continues. You deserve to be recognized as much as anyone else does, and respected just as evenly as well. This Inclusion and diversity group sounds like more of a PR move than anything with real substance, so I'd call them out on it.

    I hope either things improve, or you can find a company that supports and respects you, and your disability.

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  • Jrx1216 wrote:

    Hardwareguy wrote:

    Over the years I have had people tell me I was not qualified for jobs because of my disability.  Or I am too disabled to learn a job.  The discrimination is really bad.  I spent years studying this in graduate school where I faced professors telling me I was not smart enough to be there.  But this was the one area of employment and education that has always bothered me.  This higher you go in graduate school the worse the discrimination gets. 


    I semi-recently had a long "conversation" with a hiring manager on this topic... My job title is changing and the requirements they listed specifically excluded many disabilities (some of which I deal with myself.) I had to have them re-word, or change most of the requirements before I would even qualify myself (this is for the job I'm already doing, by the way)

    For instance, one of the requirements they had listed was to "be able to distinguish all colors".... As someone who's only ever been officially diagnosed as colorblind by a school nurse, this shouldn't have been a big deal, but I have a hard time with reds and blues and it really hit a nerve for me. There were others that were honestly more egregious, but this one in particular upset me because there is literally nothing about this job that involves colors. It felt like it was purely to exclude the 10% of the Male population and the 1% of Females who suffer from colorblindness for no good reason.

    This wasn't the only disability they seemed to be ignorant of. I say ignorant because I choose to believe it's ignorance and not malice in this case, as my company is generally pretty inclusive, but it was eye opening. My disabilities are all mostly invisible, and I can only imagine what folks with more visible disabilities have to deal with. 

    In the UK, discrimination against those with disabilities in this regard is illegal. Employers have to consider disabled applicants and have to judge if they can make 'reasonable adjustments' to accommodate a disabled candidate.

    I.E. if the requirement for being able to distinguish all colours is to be able to identify the difference between red, blue, and green network cables it would be  considered a 'reasonable adjustment' to replace the cables with colours that are distinguishable, or to use a different identification method.

    However, it may be considered 'not a reasonable adjustment' to relocate office to include wheelchair access, or to spend £50,000 to put in stair lifts.

    OP - It does seem insensitive to disregard your request to raise awareness of your condition. If there are multiple events allocated to, say, different races then it should be equally practical to allocate multiple events to different disabilities. However, if it is 1 day for race, 1 day for sexual orientation, etc. then I understand the decision to exclude your request though appreciate it will be disappointing.

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  • Ah, you see (and I apologize even though I have NOTHING to do with it), but "diversity and inclusion" is not really about you the employee, but about virtue signaling and public image for your employer. I'm sorry you had to discover it this way, might be a hard pill to swallow, but...that's the way the world works these days, hopefully some day it will change and people will just accept you for whomever you are regardless of ANY of your differences.

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  • Anymore I feel like people, companies, etc can say whatever they want but to me what matters and what should do the "talking" is how they walk the walk. I work at an EDU my issue is I'm an aspie so social things, trying new things, etc can sometimes be lacking. I feel like a lot of people want to see me improve, grow, etc. If there is something I am too afraid to do then usually I can find someone to help, show me, etc. Though sometimes someone may just say here you go this is how this works here you go and walk away then I have to actually learn it myself. 

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