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  • Nothing changed as far as having a remote workforce before or during the early parts of the pandemic and I don't see anything changing now.

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  • I definitely see remote work hear to stay.  Our department has already made the call everyone going forward everyone gets laptops unless a specific need requires a desktop.

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  • What is remote work again?

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  • It looks like our organization will be supporting remote work as much as possible going forward. We never lost production when WFH started so no reason to keep some buildings open if no one's going to occupy them.

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  • I said "no" because even though my work actually can be done remotely (and we did it this past summer), I was told I wasn't allowed to at this point, and I think it's political rather than practical.  I'm not happy about that directive.

    I know some of it came from the techs in the department whining about how my team apparently gets more freedom with time-off and butt-in-seat requirement (our work doesn't involve hands-on support with teachers & students but theirs do). Other political factors are probably involving the various unions in the district (my position isn't a represented one so it's another irritation that I have to capitulate as just a show when they start complaining again).

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  • We had remote available for the attorney's, paralegals, accounting and management since 2004.  That left just the support staff that are hourly and their remote access was monitored because of potential HR issues.  The firm has already announced flex is acceptable as there are some occasions that people do need to be in the office (ie will/estate planning signing, we will come out to your car with PPE and have it notarized on the spot etc).

    Since we own the building, and charge the attorney's overhead for their offices there are no plans to change anything.  We had already spread out assistants so no one is working closer than 12 feet to anyone else when they are on premises.  

    The firm has always been a bit lax in communication, it seems to have improved with people having to ensure that everyone on the matter are informed.

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  • Being able to work remotely has always been required for many, many years for me. That is quite different from working normal business hours from home which I am currently doing. I have worked remote many years ago when I only came to the office one day a week.

    Recent studies have shown that both employers and employees prefer a two or three day "in the office" work week. Employers find that employees can concentrate better when they work from home and collaborate better when they are in the office.

    All that said, it almost always comes down to your direct manager. Some people just need to have you under their thumb. It's sad but true. And that is the main reason I'm hesitant to change to a different remote work job because I won't know their monitoring policies or direct manager going in. I get the feeling from several people on these forums that they do not subscribe to the idea of allowing remote work (unless it is after hours).

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  • The pandemic isn't over until people don't have to stay home for 14 days because somebody coughed on them. In that respect anyone is still a candidate for WFH so we still need to support it.

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  • Aside from sales no one at the companies I support really did WFH. We have some staff working remotely but that is mainly due to social distancing not being possible since office space is tight. We will continue to support as long as the Board tells us to, but I would not be shocked that after this is all said and done they tell the non-sales staff to get back into the office. 

    I personally don't care either way, and I am not a fan of working from home. I like going into the office each day.

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  • What is this remote work that you speak of?

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  • I think overall we are saving money with people working from home.

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  • We went from absolutely no remote work allowed except sales and trainers on the road to everyone working remotely in two days.  I imagine there will be massive changes ahead still, but in our most recent round of hiring we went nationwide, so I'm hopeful we'll have options when we decide the world is back to normal.

    I personally love being at home to do my job, my coworkers here are lazy and sleep all day, but they're super cute so I don't mind picking up their slack.

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  • In a manufacturing environments, WFH was fleeting. For a while ,everyone that could did. But all were ordered back to the office. I have a feeling it is a trust issue. I think the management team prefers everyone onsite. We always have a very small mount that work full time remote. So we will continue to support it.

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  • Since I work for an MSP, we've always "worked remotely", it's just that we all met at the office to do it. However now, we may have the option to WFH permanently or do a mix although I suspect that the office may actually go away anyway. Leasing office space in this city is ridiculously expensive so the company may just ditch it in our area. We'll see.

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  • Tom6018 wrote:

    In a manufacturing environments, WFH was fleeting. For a while ,everyone that could did. But all were ordered back to the office. I have a feeling it is a trust issue. I think the management team prefers everyone onsite. We always have a very small mount that work full time remote. So we will continue to support it.

    This 100%. Even though 95% of what our office staff does can be done remotely it is hard for management to tell people working on the shop floor that the office staff's health is more important than theirs. It is obviously not true that Management values their Health over the shop floor's but that is the perception and the optics.

    We have been back in our office since the start of September and WFH is still being allowed on a case by case basis but it is to be considered the method of last resort.

    Even in other industries what I expect is more flexible WFH schedules but not permanent, its too hard to build teams, onboard, etc without actually meeting people. Our brains are wired that way.

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  • Most companies we are working with cut their active office space up to 80%, moving most employees to full-remote or hot-desk working options. They do not seem to change this in the nearest time, so I assume remote work in general and work-from-anywhere (not just WFH) in particular is the new normal.

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  • When I started my current job in May (state gov), they were already in the process of implementing partial WFH for IT staff who are able (shooting for 2-3 days per week). Since I started, I have been to the office one time--and that was to get a tour of the office and set up my jump box, that I have used precisely zero times. The IT department is currently slated for 100% WFH (for those who can) until at least the end of January 2021. We have several major projects going on right now, and the powers-that-be have noted that there has not been a drop in productivity. I'm hoping I never have to go to the office at this point. 

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  • Remote work was a great success in our company.  In addition, the business we're in (risk and due diligence) actually retained a good run-rate during the pandemic, so actually grew staffing to the point where our facilities are at capacity.  We see WFH to be a permanent solution to address staff space (both the office space and downtown parking costs), but also because it seems to remain productive and many of our staff prefer it.

    Within the IT realm, we do need to address how to involve BYOD, because before this we were very careful about allowing non-company systems from connecting via VPN.  Our clients don't want their data on systems outside our control, and to a large extent that is simply policy at this point rather than a solid firewall.  We need to deploy proxy and virtual desktops in 2021 to continue on this path.

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  • I have always been able to work from home.  That usually meant late night or weekend work.  But now it is all the time.  I personally prefer it.  Good ideas do not come out of the tap on demand.  It is nice to log back in and see if you have come up with a new approach whenever it hits you.  Plus my home office is much nicer than my setup at the company.  I never run into anyone in the halls asking me to move them up in the queue.  There are many pluses for me.  However, I do not know what the company position will be when this passes.

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  • Sage_AJ wrote:

    What is remote work again?

    Its the job you gave the kids after the remote went missing. 

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  • We're in distribution and where feasible, we were doing remote working before Covid.   For us, nothing has changed significantly so far, and I don't anticipate it changing significantly post-Covid.

    PS. Maybe terms other than "Old guard" and "curmudgeonly" would have given the question a little less of an old vs. young feel.  Some of us old curmudgeons are sensitive.

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  • TB33T wrote:

    It looks like our organization will be supporting remote work as much as possible going forward. We never lost production when WFH started so no reason to keep some buildings open if no one's going to occupy them.

    Happy to hear that WFH is working so well for your org! 
    I personally hope that the majority of companies have an overall positive WFH experience so the market as a whole will be more open to remote work. 
    Do you think y'all will be going fully remote with no dedicated office space or would it be moreso a limited capacity hot desk system?
    P.S. Nice profile pic. Whatyamean booze aint food?
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  • WeirdFish wrote:

    I said "no" because even though my work actually can be done remotely (and we did it this past summer), I was told I wasn't allowed to at this point, and I think it's political rather than practical.  I'm not happy about that directive.

    I know some of it came from the techs in the department whining about how my team apparently gets more freedom with time-off and butt-in-seat requirement (our work doesn't involve hands-on support with teachers & students but theirs do). Other political factors are probably involving the various unions in the district (my position isn't a represented one so it's another irritation that I have to capitulate as just a show when they start complaining again).

    Ugh, I'm sorry to hear that. I'd also very much not be happy about that. I get why the other teams would want the same WFH perks but if their role genuinely needs to be on-site that's just a part of their gig. No need to go full "crabs in a bucket" and force remote-compatible roles back in the office out of spite, y'know?

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  • Fessor wrote:

    Being able to work remotely has always been required for many, many years for me. That is quite different from working normal business hours from home which I am currently doing. I have worked remote many years ago when I only came to the office one day a week.

    Recent studies have shown that both employers and employees prefer a two or three day "in the office" work week. Employers find that employees can concentrate better when they work from home and collaborate better when they are in the office.

    All that said, it almost always comes down to your direct manager. Some people just need to have you under their thumb. It's sad but true. And that is the main reason I'm hesitant to change to a different remote work job because I won't know their monitoring policies or direct manager going in. I get the feeling from several people on these forums that they do not subscribe to the idea of allowing remote work (unless it is after hours).

    "both employers and employees prefer a two or three day "in the office" work week."  

    I'm curious about the part-remote strategy. While my clickbaity headline says I'm "never" going back to the office again, realistically what I actually mean is that it would take a whole lot of convincing to work from an office full time. On the other hand, I'd consider a role that's part-remote - the idea of balancing distraction-reduced periods with social interaction and collaboration sounds appealing.

    "Some people just need to have you under their thumb"

    Sad but true. The frustrating thing with that is that the sort of people that require micromanagement are exactly what remote-resistant managers pictured the entire process looking like but the majority of people really do want to put in an honest effort at work. A significant portion of the demand for our remote employee monitoring software has come from worries about slackers taking advantage of the situation (which definitely happens). Maybe I should thank them for my job security (:

    " I'm hesitant to change to a different remote work job because I won't know their monitoring policies"  

    Could you expand on this a bit? Do you mean that you're concerned that the next org you'd transition to would be too micromanagey - obsessing over mouse/keyboard activity vs output? Or do you have privacy concerns about being monitored?

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  • Sean Donnelly wrote:

    Aside from sales no one at the companies I support really did WFH. We have some staff working remotely but that is mainly due to social distancing not being possible since office space is tight. We will continue to support as long as the Board tells us to, but I would not be shocked that after this is all said and done they tell the non-sales staff to get back into the office. 

    I personally don't care either way, and I am not a fan of working from home. I like going into the office each day.

    I'm curious about that last bit. What's your take on remote vs in-office : what do you prefer about going to the office each day? Social interaction? Collaboration? Specific perks that aren't available to you at home?

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  • lilmo037 wrote:

    We went from absolutely no remote work allowed except sales and trainers on the road to everyone working remotely in two days.  I imagine there will be massive changes ahead still, but in our most recent round of hiring we went nationwide, so I'm hopeful we'll have options when we decide the world is back to normal.

    I personally love being at home to do my job, my coworkers here are lazy and sleep all day, but they're super cute so I don't mind picking up their slack.

    My "coworker" insists on jumping on my lap then sprawling all over my keyboard. I gave her her own dedicated office chair that's next to mine and now she's a lot more chill


    P.S. From 0-100% remote work capability in 2 days?! Kudos!

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  • DZee wrote:

    Remote work was a great success in our company.  In addition, the business we're in (risk and due diligence) actually retained a good run-rate during the pandemic, so actually grew staffing to the point where our facilities are at capacity.  We see WFH to be a permanent solution to address staff space (both the office space and downtown parking costs), but also because it seems to remain productive and many of our staff prefer it.

    Within the IT realm, we do need to address how to involve BYOD, because before this we were very careful about allowing non-company systems from connecting via VPN.  Our clients don't want their data on systems outside our control, and to a large extent that is simply policy at this point rather than a solid firewall.  We need to deploy proxy and virtual desktops in 2021 to continue on this path.

    Hello again! I'm delighted to hear that WFH is working well for y'all. BYOD feasibility/limitations is definitely going to be the great security debate going forward. At least deploying company-provided workstations for each employee that needs it is going to be far more cost-effective than dedicated real estate!

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  • Jimmer3407 wrote:

    I have always been able to work from home.  That usually meant late night or weekend work.  But now it is all the time.  I personally prefer it.  Good ideas do not come out of the tap on demand.  It is nice to log back in and see if you have come up with a new approach whenever it hits you.  Plus my home office is much nicer than my setup at the company.  I never run into anyone in the halls asking me to move them up in the queue.  There are many pluses for me.  However, I do not know what the company position will be when this passes.

    "Good ideas do not come out of the tap on demand. It is nice to log back in and see if you have come up with a new approach whenever it hits you. "

    I feel this SO much. I'm a creative type with a digital media background that now works in marketing - my role definitely benefits from spontaneity and breathing room to let the creativity flow. Sometimes that's during appropriate work hours and at other times it's a fever dream at 1am! 

    "Plus my home office is much nicer than my setup at the company. "

    Yup! I can customize everything exactly how I want/need and invest in upgrades over time. I hope that newly remote orgs are offering stipends for home office improvements, it makes a big difference.

    "I never run into anyone in the halls asking me to move them up in the queue. "

    Ha! I never even thought about that. Major bonus!

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  • ich.ni.san wrote:

    We're in distribution and where feasible, we were doing remote working before Covid.   For us, nothing has changed significantly so far, and I don't anticipate it changing significantly post-Covid.

    PS. Maybe terms other than "Old guard" and "curmudgeonly" would have given the question a little less of an old vs. young feel.  Some of us old curmudgeons are sensitive.

    Hahaha, duly noted! I was moreso trying to convey "old school" vs "new school" ideologies on remote work, with the assumption that the traditional approach would want butts-in-seat. My bad for the age-centric word choice (:

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  • Dale (CurrentWare) wrote:

    Do you think y'all will be going fully remote with no dedicated office space or would it be moreso a limited capacity hot desk system?

    I think we'll be going fully remote for now. Our company is spread throughout the US so in office work is handled on a state by state basis. For now I think management will try to go fully remote with no dedicated office space.

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  • We had a few 100% remote employees before the pandemic hit. Being in the early epicenter of the virus, Seattle-area, we were forced to go 100% WFH literally overnight. We still don't have anyone working onsite regularly. I foresee our company going back into the office when it's safe, but remote work will absolutely be allowed for those who don't feel comfortable working in close quarters. That said, on the marketing/sales teams we've learned that collaboration is best face to face. Even with communication tools available, there's value in the team moral and relationships built when working with each other in person. For those that do return to the office, I anticipate it will look a bit different - desks further apart, less chairs in conference rooms, etc.

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