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  • Core i7*

    With that kind of spec it should still be fast within Windows.

    Do bare in mind that Linux is a lot lighter on ram use by default, windows will try to cache frequently used programs - but all of these settings can be tweaked.

    I run windows as my main driver and have no real want to change this, however my servers - were mostly windows are now mostly linux

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  • Rod-IT wrote:

    Core i7*

    With that kind of spec it should still be fast within Windows.

    Do bare in mind that Linux is a lot lighter on ram use by default, windows will try to cache frequently used programs - but all of these settings can be tweaked.

    I run windows as my main driver and have no real want to change this, however my servers - were mostly windows are now mostly linux

    Yeah, I been doing this for over 2 decades. Not many tweaks I don't know of. Still, Windows is a dog in comparison. And now I have no viruses to worry about., :)

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  • I am cogitating as well and seeing what I can cut out entirely. I am trying to figure out how to get all the Windows admin stuff diong differently as well as get my user base off of the MS teet.

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  • spicehead-Greg wrote:

    Windows is a dog in comparison

    Always will be

    spicehead-Greg wrote:

    And now I have no viruses to worry about., :) 

    Sure it's less targeted, but that doesn't mean hackers wont use vulnerabilities in the OS or Kernel, such as the current sudo one.

    Thinking like this is the same as mac users who say they wont be infected - just because the scale of viruses is lower, does not make your device invincible

    Windows machines are not really infected with viruses these days either, it's all about ransomware, which doesn't really care what or who it infects.

    Banking ransomware has been known specifically to target mobile users on IOS and Android.

    You are less likely to be hit, but not completely impenetrable.

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  • I have a couple laptops, a desktop and a server at home. One laptop runs Linux Mint, one is a MacBook, the desktop runs Windows 10 and the server runs ProxMox with whatever I am tinkering with at that time.

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  • Rod-IT wrote:

    spicehead-Greg wrote:

    Windows is a dog in comparison

    Always will be

    spicehead-Greg wrote:

    And now I have no viruses to worry about., :) 

    Sure it's less targeted, but that doesn't mean hackers wont use vulnerabilities in the OS or Kernel, such as the current sudo one.

    Thinking like this is the same as mac users who say they wont be infected - just because the scale of viruses is lower, does not make your device invincible

    Windows machines are not really infected with viruses these days either, it's all about ransomware, which doesn't really care what or who it infects.

    Banking ransomware has been known specifically to target mobile users on IOS and Android.

    You are less likely to be hit, but not completely impenetrable.

    I still use an antivirus on it. I'm not stupid.  but my footprint just got WAY smaller!

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  • For the record I never said you was stupid or anyone else for that matter, just confirming that you still have to protect the system in the same was as a windows system.

    For those who picked mint though, why mint vs Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian or any other distro?

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  • With those specs I bet it does run like a new machine. Wish I had room to set up multiple computers at home.

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  • The last version of Windows I had at home was 98 Second Edition. I have a work laptop running win 10, but it's only used for work. These days I'm running Arch on all my home systems. One of them is a still running a 64bit P4. I have a whopping 1G RAM in it. Thing has been running for about a decade now. Sure, it's only running DNS, dhcp, and a monitoring system for my home network. However, that system goes down and my entire home network goes with it. 

    When 98 reached EOL, I had a choice to get a new computer or switch to Linux. I didn't have money to get a new computer, so I installed Linux. When I did get around to building a new system for myself, I couldn't justify paying the extra to have an OS I didn't really need (or want). Many upgrades and builds later, I still cannot justify the cost of Windows. Just an extra charge for no real benefit to me. 

    At work all our workstations and servers are windows. I wish I could move to Linux at least for the servers, but that's not an option at the moment.

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  • Rod-IT wrote:

    <...>
    For those who picked mint though, why mint vs Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian or any other distro?

    Mint is Ubuntu with all the codecs and apps not included with the others distros listed. Licensing issues tend to stop the other distros from including them by default. Mint don't care. They do it anyway. Makes things just a bit easier to get going. 

    Fedora is a test bed for Red Hat. If you want your system to break every other time you do updates, have at it. It is a good way to learn. ;-)

    Debian is good, but tends to be a bit behind the times with software versions. 

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  • I did the same. I am only supporting windows for my clients and work, otherwise all my home systems are now running Ubuntu or Mint.

    When 10 was released I was less than thrilled at all the changes made. I still loaded it up and gave it a chance. It seemed like items were harder to locate and buried deep within setting menus. Also, the list of preloaded applications I never asked for was a turn off. After I configured my first WIN 10 Pro for home PC and cleaned all the junk out, the next build pretty much brought most of it back on top reverted many settings back to default that I configured. After several builds and constant changing of items and removal of programs I was over it. I switched to Ubuntu as I mostly remote to work and watch movies on home PC, and I have never been happier. My 2 Mint boxes are more for play and for other people living in the house to use. Even if I had to purchase a Linux distro license I would still choose it over windows at this point.

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  • Be sure to disable pwfeedback module in sudo config for your Mint box; it is one of few distros that has it enabled by default

    https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2020/02/serious-flaw-that-lurked-in-sudo-for-9-years-...

    All i want for home linux is Dell XPS 13 DE, although friends dont let friends use GNOME, ever.

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  • Only 4 reasons I don't switch all of my daily drivers to Linux:

    1.  Gaming.  I like playing video games online with my friends of 2 decades.  Currently you cannot play cutting edge games like Battlefield V and Call of Duty on Linux.

    2. Outlook.  When I find an all in one email, contact, calendaring solution that works like Outlook, and is as well integrated into the OS, and my accounting system, I may very well switch over.

    3. Accounting software.  I have still to find a widely accepted business accounting system that is approved and used that runs on Linux, IE: Quickbooks, Sage etc.

    4. My clientele are 93% Windows based, I need to use Windows to be profficient.

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  • I use all flavors of Windows and Mac and Linux for home use.

    Some are better at things than others aren't.

    Yes, a lot of software can be found on Linux/Unix that were not available on them 5-10 years ago. But Windows is still king in terms of software availability and the masses developing royalty free software for it.

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  • I use various Linux Distros and find that they can virtually do everything that I need them to. Using them also means that I can use low specified hardware, so that I look in wonder when people say they need 8 GB of RAM, etc, to run Windows. I used the term "virtually" because there are some equipments such as my TomTom (a present) which can only get updated with Windows PCs. And as mentioned above some business softwares only have a Windows version.

    People inertia is one of the biggest stoppers for Linux. People like what they are used to and resist change. 

    Installation speed is one of the benefits of a Linux Distro and together with the fact that the drivers built in makes that easy. This means that backing up any needed data and trying another Distro is easy.

    Best of luck on your Linux venture. 

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  • I ran Mint as my main machine a while back. It worked good for most things. but eventually I got tired of the one offs I ran into that would take me 5 minutes on a windows machine but seemed impossible for me to figure out on linux. 

    One example that was my final straw was the ability to do a TFTP upload to a hardware device.

    or trying to find a way to reliable sync my onedrive 

    Overall Linux Mint is a nice OS though.  

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  • Rod-IT wrote:

    For the record I never said you was stupid or anyone else for that matter, just confirming that you still have to protect the system in the same was as a windows system.

    For those who picked mint though, why mint vs Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian or any other distro?

    I know you didn't.  Mint has the most in it out of the box. Very little left to do to be able to use it as desktop replacement.  It is based of Debian/Ubuntu.

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  • I currently run both Ubuntu and Windows 10 on a dual boot, so I can switch as and when i like. Using Ubuntu more and more nowadays. However the wife laptop is on Windows 10 and will remain on windows 10 she wouldn't cope with anything else but windows. My 4 year old son which be taught both as he grows older.

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  • SIDE NOTE:  It is worth its weight in gold alone just for how much better updates are to install.  No reboots needed (unless it updates the kernel) and it just keeps going.

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  • Meh I use both mainly windows for work at home my kids run windows for games, my desktop hooked up to the TV has Linux on it because I can pretty much play any game I want to play on it, not running the latest and greatest games like my kids. But I also use it to run some server stuff and as the TV DVD player on the rare occassion I have one to watch. I don't find that 10 dogs it very much so I have no real complaints about day to day windows usage.

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  • When I was a teenager, I was using Linux as my main OS for years. Back in those days I was running a mix of Slackware and Mandrake Linux depending on my mood, eventually I settled for Slackware due to it being so customisable and how great it was at just staying out of the way. In my experience Slackware is the most simple (In technical terms if you know what you're doing, you can get it to do anything), most configurable OS and the only one which stays well out of the way. 

    However Windows Vista came around and I switched back to Windows more or less permanently. I had just built a new PC around the time Vista was released and went to town on the hardware, I wanted to start playing the latest games, my favourite console was still the Dreamcast at this point and the PS2 was about to be phased out completely and I wanted to play PC games rather than investing in future consoles. Although the customisations were far more limited on Vista, I really appreciated how polished the product (as a whole package) was and how pretty much anything I wanted to run would do so without issue for the most part. Windows Media Centre to me was the best PVR I've ever used, fortunately I no longer watch linear TV so it being discontinued doesn't matter. I'm probably one of the only people who look back very fondly at Windows Vista and have nothing but good things to say about it. 

    I administer a few Linux servers & I still use Linux in Virtual Machines as I'm always interested in the latest developments on that side of things. Plasma KDE is an absolutely fantastic DE and in many ways superior to the UI in Windows. But aside from the games, I'm so invested in O365 now and although there are ways of doing these things on Linux, they're just not as complete, I don't think I'll be switching back to desktop Linux any time soon.  

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  • No. Now I've bought Windows 10, I shouldn't need to buy an OS again if this free updates for life thing is to be believed. I spend all day working on computers and I know Windows just works, why would I spend my free time trying to figure out how Linux works when I could be playing one of the vast library of PC games available on Windows.

    Plus OneDrive storage is so cheap!

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  • No viruses to worry about doesn't really mean anything security on home PC's for an IT pro is pretty much a moot point since they won't go around clicking banners, clicking on clickbait or downloading from dodgy sources.

    90% of viruses these days won't get through even the most basic of security measures on Windows or otherwise they don't build em like they used to.

    Ransomware is where it all is now, but that doesn't just install itself don't download any dodgy crap and you're good.

    There is hacking but who hacks home users? they are most likely to get your details by hacking a company instead.

    So all in all the whole "Linux is more secure" when it comes to home systems is moot.

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  • I've been running Ubuntu on my laptop for the past decade and finally removed my Windows 10 install on my desktop last month. I decided on Arch Linux. Everything is working and the unfortunate bits of software that only run on Windows can do so inside VirtualBox.

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  • I keep Windows only for games.

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  • congrats, kid. welcome to the rebellion. together, we kill big tech.

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  • Ah Linux, the IT worlds equivalent of Veganism... want to know who uses Linux? Wait, they WILL tell you, and then argue why anything else is just wrong...

    "My Core i7 (Gen4) with 24GB memory, 1TB SSD and GeForce 1030 feels like a new machine." what, you mean like if you had installed a clean copy of windows on it?

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  • I only use Windows when there is a paycheque involved, so welcome to the club, you're gonna love it :)

    And Jimbo: Sadly not even close my friend, you'd have to work pretty hard to screw up a linux install enough to make it run like Windows.  Fun example, my Mum had an old core2 which used to crash running Win7 a few years back, could never get any diag out of Windows to find out why, reinstalled Windows, still did it.  In a last ditch effort I put a Linux distro on for her to use for a few weeks to see if I could get better logs to tell me what was causing the system to lock up, it never crashed again, I finally retired the machine when I built her replacement i7.  I have many other examples of success, but I do agree a lot of Linux users are a bit like Vegans, so I won't bore you for hours :)

    You should try it though, see why we're all so happy!

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  • I've used macOS, Windows, and Linux at home over the past 16 years.  I have a Ubuntu laptop that I use occasionally, Windows PC for gaming and music recording, and a couple of Macs over the years.  Work is primarily Apple based, and I have learned to enjoy this hybrid OS for Windows server and Linux server management; Microsoft has an awesome RDP app that I've stored connections in for my Windows servers, and being able to drop into a terminal and SSH into another Mac or Linux server without needing to install PuTTY or another Terminal app is great.  

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  • If you are looking for a gaming system, then yes you will buy a windows 10 system. As far as O365 goes meh most if not all of that can be done by Linux. Accounting yes there are newer accounting systems out there however, compound interest has not changed in a while.  The green caps are the only accounts I still only really trust, and accountants are going virtual anyway. M$ has the best lawyers not the best software. Windows is currently switching to a CLI and there PowerShell is an attempt at doing Linux inside a windows box. The whole reason for the PowerShell is that it is easier to use a CLI to script and make bulk changes using a CLI and it takes much less overhead. The Linux vs Windows debate is the same one that was going on with Linux Vs Unix... Look how that turned out. Linux is the cutting edge and if you look most of your devices have a Linux kernel in them for operations. The end users need something simple and clickable to do their work. I love watching people using a high heal to hang pictures and a knife instead of a flathead. Proper tool for job will always be the rule. Linux has come a long way towards being a desktop usable system. Is it there yet, NO, will it every be... Probably not? The internet was built around tinkers, and Linux is the tool for tinkering. Once Linux becomes a profit center it will no longer be the tool of tinkers. Linux is a very powerful tool with all the source code for people to dream and build and it is shared. M$ is still reaping the bennies of all the free developers. Look closely at your devices and see how much GPL is in there. That is thanks to Linux and our world M$ is just in our orbit.

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  • I've been running Mint on my laptop for the last dozen laptops or so, starting with Red Hat on a little Gateway Pentium 266, through a Compaq, a little Dell D410 that I had 3 or 4 of, D600, D800, E5300, my current machine is a little Acer Spin 1 that I got at WalMart. 

    The Spin never got a chance to even boot Windows 10 s, and it would have been an absolute dog if it had, it only has 64G of MMC drive space and is lower spec than a lot of Chromebooks. But, with Mint MATE, it's quick and light and does what I need, remote access, VM control, web, e-mail, Netflix when I'm away from home.

    My primary machine at work is running Mint as well, with Virtualbox holding the Windows VM that I run just because of Outlook and the ability to offer remote assistance through Lansweeper.

    On VMs in general, I think it's the only sane way to run Windows, true snapshots before updates have saved my backside more times than I can count.

    I've tried to get the company to consider running Windows as a KVM here just to speed up the deployment of updates, NFS, SSH, and one image for all could do some amazing things here.

    My first Linux machine was running Yggdrasil (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yggdrasil_Linux/GNU/X), on a 486 DX2/80, followed by Red Hat 4 on a Pentium 60

    I think two of my children run Windows, but they'll grow up soon enough.

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  • Mike,

    Points 2,3, and 4 are exactly why I have not migrated to Linux at home, plus the added fact that I also work on my Windows 10 pc at home and have to have about 9 different VPN clients installed which most do not have a *nix counterpart.

    But with all of that said, I have now made room on my desk area for a second workstation setup and will be installing either RH or Ubuntu. RH just for the mere fact that we use it at the university. The added benefit is that it will finally make me more well rounded and I just might be able to learn something.

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  • I gave up on windows at home 5 years ago, currently running kubuntu on a Xeon with 32 GB RAM an SSD and a 1 GB Video Card...windows can't touch the performance...

    I thought I would miss some of the software I used on windows, but nope, not really. There is no looking back for me. I deal with 100% windows (all flavors) at work and frankly it is frustrating as hell.

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  • I have a lab at home and I have a couple of Linux machines there. But essentially, I use Windows 10 Pro at home on my main desktop and laptop. Actually, my Windows computer is a 2011 old Core i7 with 16GB ram and 512SSD. It's so fast and reliable I don't plan to change it at all.

    I have veeam endpoint backup so if something happens, I can restore in just a few minutes. And most data is saved in the Cloud (Dropbox) and synched with my Synology NAS so I have access to all my data (files, software, photos, etc) from any home computer without issues. I can even use the reset option in windows without problems.

    I have a touch screen (Dell) and my kids paint and play with that, no issues in Windows 10.

    And I have one dedicated Win10 PC with PLEX server, works like a charm, with tons of performance, much better than my big Synology NAS.

    BTW I have some special hardware (PLC, Microscope, etc) and software / drivers is only available for Windows. Even the accounting and invoice software we use is only available for Windows 10.

    At work, we use Windows 10 Enterprise (6000 machines). Very nice control, monitoring, and security via AD, SCCM, GPO, IDS, Crowdstrike, Forescout, NAC, etc.

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  • Actually looking back I will admit back around 2009, I was using a laptop so I could have two screens, (no dual head cards on any of the desktops where I worked at the time and they weren't buying upgrades I actually have Debian isntalled on it and ran XP s a VM on the laptop, funny XP ran better in the VM than it did when I had it on the hardware. But that was a special case and haven't really had need since Windows 7 o have such a setup.

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  • Damien64 wrote:

    No viruses to worry about doesn't really mean anything security on home PC's for an IT pro is pretty much a moot point since they won't go around clicking banners, clicking on clickbait or downloading from dodgy sources.

    90% of viruses these days won't get through even the most basic of security measures on Windows or otherwise they don't build em like they used to.

    Ransomware is where it all is now, but that doesn't just install itself don't download any dodgy crap and you're good.

    There is hacking but who hacks home users? they are most likely to get your details by hacking a company instead.

    So all in all the whole "Linux is more secure" when it comes to home systems is moot.

    Maybe, but what's not moot is how much faster the 5 year old machine is now, how much easier the updates are to install (and never require reboots), how much more stable it is and, oh year, IT'S ALL FREE.   :)

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  • The only reason I have a Microsoft operating system at home is because I own Xbox systems.     Or if I bring home the work laptop.    Been doing the current job for the past 8 years, but there has been a Mac on my desk at home since 2004.  And no Windows machine of my own since 2009 or 2010.  Not quite sure since the one I had remained off, got fried and I only discovered it was broken when I turned it on.
    Some day soon I'll do stuff with the Raspberry Pi.    Back in the 1990s, I did what you did-- Had Unix at home and much more of it at work.   Then around 2000 the computers on my desk at work were PCs and no longer a Sun Workstation so I started to use Windows and do IT stuff with Windows 2000, and Windows 2003.   Since then the job has been more IT or teaching and one has to include Microsoft whether you like it or not.
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  • jamie.welch wrote:

    congrats, kid. welcome to the rebellion. together, we kill big tech.

    Kid?  I'm 56.  how the Hell old are you?  lol

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  • Jimbotheitbod wrote:

    Ah Linux, the IT worlds equivalent of Veganism... want to know who uses Linux? Wait, they WILL tell you, and then argue why anything else is just wrong...

    "My Core i7 (Gen4) with 24GB memory, 1TB SSD and GeForce 1030 feels like a new machine." what, you mean like if you had installed a clean copy of windows on it?

    I did install a clean copy of windows on this.  I been doing this since the late 80's, I forgot more than most people know.  I'll be nice now, but that statement was a bit condescending... and 100% wrong.
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  • Jimbotheitbod wrote:

    Ah Linux, the IT worlds equivalent of Veganism... want to know who uses Linux? Wait, they WILL tell you, and then argue why anything else is just wrong...

    "My Core i7 (Gen4) with 24GB memory, 1TB SSD and GeForce 1030 feels like a new machine." what, you mean like if you had installed a clean copy of windows on it?

    Nah, not wrong...just not right. 

    I don't want my OS spying on me...it's the MAIN reason I don't do windows at home.

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  • General Tsao wrote:

    Jimbotheitbod wrote:

    Ah Linux, the IT worlds equivalent of Veganism... want to know who uses Linux? Wait, they WILL tell you, and then argue why anything else is just wrong...

    "My Core i7 (Gen4) with 24GB memory, 1TB SSD and GeForce 1030 feels like a new machine." what, you mean like if you had installed a clean copy of windows on it?

    Nah, not wrong...just not right. 

    I don't want my OS spying on me...it's the MAIN reason I don't do windows at home.

    I just meant this as a polite discussion.  Everyone has their own likes.  No different than one person liking Ford, while another likes Chevy.  Neither are wrong.  Different strokes for different folks.  But there is always someone who gets ignorant in their responses.  The ONLY thing I miss about "the good old days" is that social media has tossed manners out the window. (not you by the way)  I hope everyone has an AWESOME day!  :)

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  • spicehead-Greg wrote:

    SIDE NOTE:  It is worth its weight in gold alone just for how much better updates are to install.  No reboots needed (unless it updates the kernel) and it just keeps going.

    I think you are underestimating it's worth.  Software weighs nothing and it's certainly more valuable than zero.

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  • Ethan6123 wrote:

    spicehead-Greg wrote:

    SIDE NOTE:  It is worth its weight in gold alone just for how much better updates are to install.  No reboots needed (unless it updates the kernel) and it just keeps going.

    I think you are underestimating it's worth.  Software weighs nothing and it's certainly more valuable than zero.

    Ok. that hurt my brain.  lol

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  • Linux is a great concept, I love the idea of open source, free, "by the users for the users". But in practice...eh. I've tried to switch a few times but always crawl back to Windows. Just the lack of apps and the antiquated way of actually getting most of the apps that do exist. And obviously for gaming, there's been some attempts, certain games have been released on Linux, but overall gaming is basically a non-starter.
    My most recent foray was I was going to use Linux for a media server build. But it wouldn't recognize any of my drives! I wasted an entire lovely spring weekend trying to figure it out, never did. Installed Windows on the same HDD on the same machine. The drives all appeared. I'll never get that weekend back. 
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  • ZebraMike wrote:

    Only 4 reasons I don't switch all of my daily drivers to Linux:

    1.  Gaming.  I like playing video games online with my friends of 2 decades.  Currently you cannot play cutting edge games like Battlefield V and Call of Duty on Linux.

    2. Outlook.  When I find an all in one email, contact, calendaring solution that works like Outlook, and is as well integrated into the OS, and my accounting system, I may very well switch over.

    3. Accounting software.  I have still to find a widely accepted business accounting system that is approved and used that runs on Linux, IE: Quickbooks, Sage etc.

    4. My clientele are 93% Windows based, I need to use Windows to be profficient.

    I agree with you. I went from being a Linux Admin to a consultant/jack of all trades. I had to keep Windows on hand for my accounting software. My bookkeeper did NOT care for GNUCash at all.
    I also find that if I'm not running Windows as my daily driver I'm having to say "Let me check on that for you" more often than I like. That proficiency is paramount to good customer service.
    I really do miss using Linux full time.

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  • LeeHHC wrote:

    Linux is a great concept, I love the idea of open source, free, "by the users for the users". But in practice...eh. I've tried to switch a few times but always crawl back to Windows. Just the lack of apps and the antiquated way of actually getting most of the apps that do exist. And obviously for gaming, there's been some attempts, certain games have been released on Linux, but overall gaming is basically a non-starter.
    My most recent foray was I was going to use Linux for a media server build. But it wouldn't recognize any of my drives! I wasted an entire lovely spring weekend trying to figure it out, never did. Installed Windows on the same HDD on the same machine. The drives all appeared. I'll never get that weekend back. 

    No doubt about the gaming aspect, but I'm not a gamer.  I just need a fast stable machine to do what I need to do.

    Mint does a great detecting everything on any machine I installed it on.  Other distros are not as good, IMHO.  But definitely moot if you game. 

    I have 4 desktops, 3 laptops, a Chromebook and rack server at home.  I have options if "Windurrs" needs the call.  If I were limited to one machine, it would have to be Windows 10 (which I never said I disliked.  It is a fine OS.)

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  • Kevin.Davison wrote:

    ZebraMike wrote:

    Only 4 reasons I don't switch all of my daily drivers to Linux:

    1.  Gaming.  I like playing video games online with my friends of 2 decades.  Currently you cannot play cutting edge games like Battlefield V and Call of Duty on Linux.

    2. Outlook.  When I find an all in one email, contact, calendaring solution that works like Outlook, and is as well integrated into the OS, and my accounting system, I may very well switch over.

    3. Accounting software.  I have still to find a widely accepted business accounting system that is approved and used that runs on Linux, IE: Quickbooks, Sage etc.

    4. My clientele are 93% Windows based, I need to use Windows to be profficient.

    I agree with you. I went from being a Linux Admin to a consultant/jack of all trades. I had to keep Windows on hand for my accounting software. My bookkeeper did NOT care for GNUCash at all.
    I also find that if I'm not running Windows as my daily driver I'm having to say "Let me check on that for you" more often than I like. That proficiency is paramount to good customer service.
    I really do miss using Linux full time.

    Agree too.  I am a full time Windows Sysadmin and Director of Technology.  I also have my own business out of my home.  So I need to keep up on all things Windows.  I also keep up on Mac and the iOS, both of which I am very good at, despite really HATING to use it.  What we gotta do to make a buck, huh?   lol

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  • Rod-IT wrote:

    For the record I never said you was stupid or anyone else for that matter, just confirming that you still have to protect the system in the same was as a windows system.

    For those who picked mint though, why mint vs Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian or any other distro?

    I tried Mint, ElementaryOS, Ubuntu and Zorin OS.  Zorin was super buggy for me so it didn't last long.  I didn't like Ubuntu's interface (out of the box), Elementary has a pretty interface if you are looking for a MAC OS feel, but I just found myself liking Mint Cinnamon (Ubuntu based) the best  I run it on 3 out of the 4 workstations I have now, one still has Windows 10.  Linux Mint and LibreOffice is all I really need at home.  My work laptop runs Win 10 but is only used for work purposes.
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  • I have 4 desktops, 3 laptops, a Chromebook and rack server at home.  I have options if "Windurrs" needs the call.  If I were limited to one machine, it would have to be Windows 10 (which I never said I disliked.  It is a fine OS.)

    That sort of stuff is really a great way to keep hands on.
    I run 5 OpenElec boxes and use unRAID for storage. All of that gets fed by a set of Linux VM's for Couchpotato, Sonarr, SabNZBD, asterisk and other such handy goodies. Our personal laptops and desktops all run Windows at the moment.
    There are loads of places that Linux can play a strong part in a home network.
    I think there is a place for the two to coexist. It's all about fitting the right OS for the right application and what that looks like is different for all of us.

    Spice (1) flagReport
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  • spicehead-Greg, While I still have all Windows at home for what I use (except for Raspberry Pi systems), I'd be interested in hearing an update from you periodically.

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