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  • Double check to see if they are affected by a bug with GPS that can affect the time and a few other things with the device as this may cause problems with using them down the line. If not affected then get the most out of them until they become too slow or battery life is too bad for day to day use. If they are affected maybe time for an upgrade.

    Apple Support link to information on the issue:  https://support.apple.com/en-gb/HT210239

    " Starting just before 12:00 a.m. UTC on November 3, 2019,* some iPhone and iPad models introduced in 2012 and earlier will require an iOS update to maintain accurate GPS location and keep the correct date and time. This is due to the GPS time rollover issue that began affecting GPS-enabled products from other manufacturers on April 6, 2019. Affected Apple devices are not impacted until just before 12:00 a.m. UTC on November 3, 2019."

    Spice (1) flagReport
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  • Well I would replace them, but I think it depends if its worth it to you and what software could break by not updating it. If you are doing any type testing on them, it might give you errors. 

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  • I feel that anything that is EOL should be replaced (Consider Windows 7 in January 2020). 

    If it is EOL, it is not getting security updates anymore and becomes a potential security risk. Obviously, the second it becomes EOL it is not immediately vulnerable, but as soon as a security update comes out that it does not get, it has that hole.

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  • Depends on their use case.  In our elementary, we use them for testing and assessment.  If they don't meet the testing app requirements, out they go.  

    If they are general use, I'll wring every last bit of use out of them.  Usually the screen/connector/homebutton gives out before they age out of ipadOS.

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  • My opinion (based on my 4 years of experience working with mobile devices [on top of my overall IT experience]) is that they should be replaced either by end of support or device EOL. This is especially true of Apple devices. The main issue with wildcard mobile devices is that physical control can't always be maintained (mostly because of human nature) so you definitely don't need to incur the security risk of outdated and EOL devices. 

    Eric

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  • I may be tardy to the party here, but I figured I'd share our policy toward EOL iPads. We have a good number of them still in use, managed by MDM of course, in low-impact areas. Basically, if they fail, it's not the end of the world as we would usually have another cycle of EOLs either available or coming available relatively soon. However, they are still serving a purpose and that saves us replacement cost on a new device to serve the same function.

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