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  • I wonder how this compares with OpenDNS/Cisco Umbrella? I've recommended them for years for the same purpose. It's good to have some competition.

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  • I dont see anything about pricing the OpenDns Robert mentions show pricing not bad either is the Clean Browsing comparable?

    https://www.opendns.com/home-internet-security/


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  • You can use OpenDNS's IPs for DNS for free. This blocks most malware. The paid service gives you management, control over categories, and a roaming client.

    OpenDNS was pretty good and then it was bought by Cisco. To my amazement, Cisco made it better.

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  • Robert5205 wrote:

    You can use OpenDNS's IPs for DNS for free. This blocks most malware. The paid service gives you management, control over categories, and a roaming client.

    OpenDNS was pretty good and then it was bought by Cisco. To my amazement, Cisco made it better.

    That sentiment is how I feel about their acquisition of DUO.  Duo is pretty amazing so far, I hope it stays that way or gets better.

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  • PatrickFarrell wrote:

    Robert5205 wrote:

    You can use OpenDNS's IPs for DNS for free. This blocks most malware. The paid service gives you management, control over categories, and a roaming client.

    OpenDNS was pretty good and then it was bought by Cisco. To my amazement, Cisco made it better.

    That sentiment is how I feel about their acquisition of DUO.  Duo is pretty amazing so far, I hope it stays that way or gets better.

    Agreed. We're invested pretty heavily.

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  • brianwhelton wrote:

    I've not used this myself, and my kid is 24 in a few days and so I don't have a use for this, however I know there are many parents, aunts, uncles and other type of guardians, not to forget all those working in education.

    Someone told me about this new service, like I said, I've not tested it, but it looks like an excellent idea.

    Basically it's a DNS service that filters adult content and known phishing domains, but more interestingly, it supports DNSCrypt (port 8443), DNS over TLS (port 853) and DNS over HTTPS (port 443) and by default it uses and Anycast DNS network they have create to improve speed.

    The website is https://cleanbrowsing.org/ and there appears to be a free and a paid for service (offering further customisation), The addresses they use are  185.228.168.168 and 185.228.169.168.

    Interesting, although Pihole is pretty good.

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  • There's also Comodo's Dome packages, one of which is free:

    https://cdome.comodo.com/dns-internet-security.php?track=11595&af=11595#compare-packages 

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  • As with any filtering that relies on DNS service, just watch out for the kids that figure out how to manually change their DNS settings to get around it. Don't let them have Admin rights if you can, and/or put a filter solution at or in your gateway.

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  • Here's the pricing:

    https://cleanbrowsing.org/plans

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  • I will put this on the same shelf as my Pandora's Hope router, and return my focus to keeping kids out of my house.  

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  • This is really nice! I'm going to use this at home and pass around to extended family and friends.

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  • OPenDNS for home is free

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  • This is a great service to offer... Very useful for schools and homes with small children. I've used FamilySafe from OpenDNS for years and it works wonderfully. And it's free!!!

    208.67.222.123

    208.67.220.123

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  • It protects us from the internet?!

    Won't be using that then, i love playing with my life when i turn my PC on!

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  • I'm going to go out on a limb and express my skepticism; namely that so far I've never seen an  "adult content filter" that does it well.

    Problem is that there are as many different opinions on what's "child-appropriate content" as there are parents, and these filters are inevitably going to block content that some parents think is fine, while allowing content that others would rather their children not see. How many times do we need to see stories about filters blocking LGBT support sites, or legitimate sex education sites, for example? 

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  • Thanks for sharing! I've been meaning to look into OpenDNS  for home use.

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  • https://www.opendns.com/home-internet-security/


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  • deanmoncaster wrote:

    It protects us from the internet?!

    Won't be using that then, i love playing with my life when i turn my PC on!

    Nah, it'll just protect you from yourself.

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  • I too wonder how it would discern a legitimately inappropriate sex site from an LGBTQ+ support or educational site. 

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  • A DNS service designed to protect kids....Should work great for most office users then. Especially the the ancient lady in every accounting department who clicks everything unquestioningly.

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  • Looks great.  Definitely going to try it.

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  • My one issue with OpenDNS free is you cannot force the use of SafeSearch on image searches.

    Looks like Cleanbrowsing.org offers that option, not sure if at the free tier or only paid. 

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  • OpenDNS lets you choose by category and whitelist/blacklist additional domains as need be. Pretty much any filtering provider/product does this. Nothing is going to work for everyone out of the box. 

    EdT wrote:

    I'm going to go out on a limb and express my skepticism; namely that so far I've never seen an  "adult content filter" that does it well.

    Problem is that there are as many different opinions on what's "child-appropriate content" as there are parents, and these filters are inevitably going to block content that some parents think is fine, while allowing content that others would rather their children not see. How many times do we need to see stories about filters blocking LGBT support sites, or legitimate sex education sites, for example? 

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  • Adeptus wrote:

    OpenDNS lets you choose by category and whitelist/blacklist additional domains as need be. Pretty much any filtering provider/product does this. Nothing is going to work for everyone out of the box. 

    EdT wrote:

    I'm going to go out on a limb and express my skepticism; namely that so far I've never seen an  "adult content filter" that does it well.

    Problem is that there are as many different opinions on what's "child-appropriate content" as there are parents, and these filters are inevitably going to block content that some parents think is fine, while allowing content that others would rather their children not see. How many times do we need to see stories about filters blocking LGBT support sites, or legitimate sex education sites, for example? 

    On that we do agree. Problem is people just using the defaults (or in the case of this product, the free version) and thinking everything is hunky-dory.

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  • For child protection this is one of the best

    K9

    http://www1.k9webprotection.com/

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  • Very tempting to use it at work.

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  • Curtis3363 wrote:

    For child protection this is one of the best

    K9

    http://www1.k9webprotection.com/

    Until it crashes your computer. Been there, done that. Many times.

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  • When it comes to protecting my kids the easy part is setting up security at home or any network that you manage, like you read in all the comments their is various Secure DNS platforms that can be used if implemented correctly, I myself use OpenDNS

    The one thing that I am looking for is better security on the mobile platforms. Yes I know you can download an some Apps which I have played with before but what happens if the phone get Formatted, not all apps prevent this from happening.

    The one thing that I have to say on this is some Mobile providers is moving towards protecting Kids from this on their Network:
    See below Examples.
    Vodacom:
    https://www.vodacom.co.za/vodacom/services/convenience-and-security/account-services/vodacom-parenta...




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  • EdT wrote:

    I'm going to go out on a limb and express my skepticism; namely that so far I've never seen an  "adult content filter" that does it well.

    Problem is that there are as many different opinions on what's "child-appropriate content" as there are parents, and these filters are inevitably going to block content that some parents think is fine, while allowing content that others would rather their children not see. How many times do we need to see stories about filters blocking LGBT support sites, or legitimate sex education sites, for example? 

     I think they are just called "Content Filters".  I work in a school, 1200± students, we use a Bloxx content filter.  I haven't heard from any teachers that questionable content is getting through on our LAN.   If you're worried about the the occasional false positive or true negative, you can't have it both ways.  Content filtering a is best effort at best.  If a user wants to find something, they will find it...
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  • chivo243 wrote:

    EdT wrote:

    I'm going to go out on a limb and express my skepticism; namely that so far I've never seen an  "adult content filter" that does it well.

    Problem is that there are as many different opinions on what's "child-appropriate content" as there are parents, and these filters are inevitably going to block content that some parents think is fine, while allowing content that others would rather their children not see. How many times do we need to see stories about filters blocking LGBT support sites, or legitimate sex education sites, for example? 

     I think they are just called "Content Filters".  I work in a school, 1200± students, we use a Bloxx content filter.  I haven't heard from any teachers that questionable content is getting through on our LAN.   If you're worried about the the occasional false positive or true negative, you can't have it both ways.  Content filtering a is best effort at best.  If a user wants to find something, they will find it...

    I think if you are running a school then erring on the side of caution is best!

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  • when it comes to content filtering i don't find it a bad think to get false positives... i'd rather it be blocking than letting through questionable sites.

    I don't have kids of my own.. but i think the bigger problem is mobile devices and what kids can access and use on them. I've seen a load of comments on it blocking LGBT support sites and sex ed sites?? honestly, i didn't have that growing up and i would expect parents to take the initiative and talk to their kids about it... not leave it up to a website. if the parent is relying on a site to explain this to their kids and it gets blocked... you can whitelist the site (the magic of this technology eh!)

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  • EdT wrote:

    Adeptus wrote:

    OpenDNS lets you choose by category and whitelist/blacklist additional domains as need be. Pretty much any filtering provider/product does this. Nothing is going to work for everyone out of the box. 

    EdT wrote:

    I'm going to go out on a limb and express my skepticism; namely that so far I've never seen an  "adult content filter" that does it well.

    Problem is that there are as many different opinions on what's "child-appropriate content" as there are parents, and these filters are inevitably going to block content that some parents think is fine, while allowing content that others would rather their children not see. How many times do we need to see stories about filters blocking LGBT support sites, or legitimate sex education sites, for example? 

    On that we do agree. Problem is people just using the defaults (or in the case of this product, the free version) and thinking everything is hunky-dory.

    Well, if they are satisfied with the results they are getting with the default settings, why *isn't* everything hunky-dory, for them at least?

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  • CarlosTech wrote:

    I've seen a load of comments on it blocking LGBT support sites and sex ed sites?? honestly, i didn't have that growing up and i would expect parents to take the initiative and talk to their kids about it... not leave it up to a website. if the parent is relying on a site to explain this to their kids and it gets blocked... you can whitelist the site (the magic of this technology eh!)

    Not all parents are supportive of their kids who may be LGBT, but the availability of resources and support for LGBT youth is an important component in reducing risk factors for things like suicide, drug use, and STIs. According to the Human Rights Campaign, 42% of LGBT youth report that they live in a community that is "not accepting", and the rate of homelessness among this demographic is more than double their straight peers, with a significant number reporting that this is due to either being forced out of the home because of their sexual identity, or that they fled because of abuse tied to that sexual identity.. Access to support and resources for LGBT youth is important, and to "expect parents to take the initiative" is simply not always the solution.

    MarkPayton wrote:

    EdT wrote:

    Adeptus wrote:

    OpenDNS lets you choose by category and whitelist/blacklist additional domains as need be. Pretty much any filtering provider/product does this. Nothing is going to work for everyone out of the box. 

    EdT wrote:

    I'm going to go out on a limb and express my skepticism; namely that so far I've never seen an  "adult content filter" that does it well.

    Problem is that there are as many different opinions on what's "child-appropriate content" as there are parents, and these filters are inevitably going to block content that some parents think is fine, while allowing content that others would rather their children not see. How many times do we need to see stories about filters blocking LGBT support sites, or legitimate sex education sites, for example? 

    On that we do agree. Problem is people just using the defaults (or in the case of this product, the free version) and thinking everything is hunky-dory.

    Well, if they are satisfied with the results they are getting with the default settings, why *isn't* everything hunky-dory, for them at least?

    Sadly, there are a lot of parents out there who are satisfied with their kids having access blocked to "them damn gay sites" or "that filthy sex education stuff". That doesn't mean it's hunky-dory for the kids who are being cut off from these resources.

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  • How does a DNS service figure out a paedophile is chatting your kids up on a homework forum?

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  • Phill7895 wrote:

    How does a DNS service figure out a paedophile is chatting your kids up on a homework forum?

    Russians have a ton of DNS redirect servers.

    People who search for Kim Kardashian anything at 50/50 likely to hit a Russian DNS server.

    Or anything kids attempt to search for.

    Then the rabbit hole begins

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  • EdT wrote:

    I'm going to go out on a limb and express my skepticism; namely that so far I've never seen an  "adult content filter" that does it well.

    Problem is that there are as many different opinions on what's "child-appropriate content" as there are parents, and these filters are inevitably going to block content that some parents think is fine, while allowing content that others would rather their children not see. How many times do we need to see stories about filters blocking LGBT support sites, or legitimate sex education sites, for example? 

    I mostly agree, there is no perfect system. But, I would rather deal with the occasional need to white list, than to have nothing at all for my kids. My kids are grown and on their own now, but if I still had them, Sophos Home provides pretty good filtering they can't bypass, and I would be more than happy to have to white list once in a while, rather than they run amuck. But, it's a personal choice how much protection you want, and what one is willing to do to manage it.

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  • woohoo lets the kids on the internet. LOL.

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  • I use OpenDNS on my family's machines along with Rollback Rx and I find we're well protected but I'd definitely be open to trying this to see if there's a security advantage to this new service.

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  • Hey folks, let's try to keep this chat about DNS and filtering and not delve into a discussion about handling LGBT children.  Feel free to start a topic in the Soapbox if you'd like to discuss that though.

    Thanks!

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  • Securly is another service like this.  It is used heavily by schools, especially in Illinois.

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  • JFEB wrote:

    deanmoncaster wrote:

    It protects us from the internet?!

    Won't be using that then, i love playing with my life when i turn my PC on!

    Nah, it'll just protect you from yourself.

    Doesn't that take all the fun out of it?

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  • EdT wrote:

    CarlosTech wrote:

    I've seen a load of comments on it blocking LGBT support sites and sex ed sites?? honestly, i didn't have that growing up and i would expect parents to take the initiative and talk to their kids about it... not leave it up to a website. if the parent is relying on a site to explain this to their kids and it gets blocked... you can whitelist the site (the magic of this technology eh!)

    Not all parents are supportive of their kids who may be LGBT, but the availability of resources and support for LGBT youth is an important component in reducing risk factors for things like suicide, drug use, and STIs. According to the Human Rights Campaign, 42% of LGBT youth report that they live in a community that is "not accepting", and the rate of homelessness among this demographic is more than double their straight peers, with a significant number reporting that this is due to either being forced out of the home because of their sexual identity, or that they fled because of abuse tied to that sexual identity.. Access to support and resources for LGBT youth is important, and to "expect parents to take the initiative" is simply not always the solution.

    MarkPayton wrote:

    EdT wrote:

    Adeptus wrote:

    OpenDNS lets you choose by category and whitelist/blacklist additional domains as need be. Pretty much any filtering provider/product does this. Nothing is going to work for everyone out of the box. 

    EdT wrote:

    I'm going to go out on a limb and express my skepticism; namely that so far I've never seen an  "adult content filter" that does it well.

    Problem is that there are as many different opinions on what's "child-appropriate content" as there are parents, and these filters are inevitably going to block content that some parents think is fine, while allowing content that others would rather their children not see. How many times do we need to see stories about filters blocking LGBT support sites, or legitimate sex education sites, for example? 

    On that we do agree. Problem is people just using the defaults (or in the case of this product, the free version) and thinking everything is hunky-dory.

    Well, if they are satisfied with the results they are getting with the default settings, why *isn't* everything hunky-dory, for them at least?

    Sadly, there are a lot of parents out there who are satisfied with their kids having access blocked to "them damn gay sites" or "that filthy sex education stuff". That doesn't mean it's hunky-dory for the kids who are being cut off from these resources.

    I get it. I do. Really. BUT something that is often overlooked is the fact that we are talking about KIDS. That means that they don't pay the bills for that internet connection. The parents do. The parents are typically also paying for the roof over their head, the food in their mouth, the clothes on their back, etc.. While the law stipulates that the parents must provide most of those things, it says nothing about parents having to provide unfiltered internet access. Therefore the parents get to say how and when the internet connection is used. That said, parents should have the ability to filter whatever they deem unfit for their child's consumption in their own home. I do realize this means that sometimes the kids that truly need it, won't have access to the LGBT support sites from the comfort of their home. It stinks, but the fact is that it is the right of the provider of the connection to define how the connection is used. 

    That said... Almost all of the parents I know have zero filtering. I mean nothing at all. I have had a few parents over the years ask me to help filter their internet. Most of those cases, I was hesitant because they weren't tech savvy enough to use it without having to constantly engage me to adjust it. The very few parents that were savvy enough, only ended up blocking the typical porn, violence and gambling sites. I say this because this makes me feel that while some parents will use this technology, most wont. Out of the relatively few that do, there is an even smaller chance of one of them having an LGBT child is even slimmer.

    So, I'm not saying that an LGBT child wont have access to support resources as a result of internet filtering in the home. I am saying that base don my experience, its going to be a real small percentage. Hopefully, those few kids that do fall into this category will be able to find the support they need through other connections or avenues.

    But telling the parents what they should and should not allow their child access to (within reason) is not something that should be up to the state or anyone else.

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  • these services are selling your browsing habits/data mining. anything free voids your privacy.

    while you think you are protected from porn and such the real threat is that you THINK you are protected when infact everything you search gets resolved through their servers. god know who owns them. 

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  • @old_IT_guy
    when you refer to an LGBT child, do mean a human child? if you are, why don't you refer to them as such?( just a child.)

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  • Sounds excellent.  Thank you for sharing!

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  • Philippe6113 wrote:

    @old_IT_guy
    when you refer to an LGBT child, do mean a human child? if you are, why don't you refer to them as such?( just a child.)

    No offense intended. Sheesh.

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  • Why can't websites have a mandatory age range embedded into their code, Something similar to film censorship and classes . That why someone could write an app that reads the date code of the website and then blocks it as needed.

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