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  • I suggest exim/postfix/sendmail or qmail(ugh) arent email servers, just smtp servers. You need Courier or something to provide the ability to have non-server local users access the mailbox... just saying.

    Spice (7) flagReport
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  • Got out of self hosted on prem email servers a long time ago. We use both G Suite and Office 365 side by side at the moment and I much prefer G Suite from an ease of management and ease of use point of view.

    Spice (18) flagReport
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  • Lotus all the way!  We'll have none of this modern malarky thank you.

    Spice (26) flagReport
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  • Prefer the in house nature of exchange on prem, but something has to be said for the ease and stability of O365 - well most of the time. 
    Think we are at O364 so far this year... 

    Spice (14) flagReport
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  • I've used exim, Exchange, Mercury, O365, postfix, qmail and sendmail.

    In this day and age (assuming the organization can afford the monthly per-user subscription fees) G-Suite or O365 would be #1

    If the goal is low cost / on premise then exim or maybe postfix, with dovecot or something with more bells and whistles (on up to Exchange on prem).

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  • Office 365 is the best email service and It provides many advanced features for our users and anyone can access the Office 365 mailbox and in any device.

    I think this the best for business purpose.

    Thanks 

    Spice (4) flagReport
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  • Depending on business and compliance needs of course, but my vote is O 365 . No more worrying about updates, DAGs maintenance or upgrades.

    Spice (3) flagReport
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  • Is there anything other than sendmail (hackers delight), or exchange / hosted / office 365 that is seriously considered by ANYONE?

    Spice (5) flagReport
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  • I brought our email in-house to reduce cost (saved tens of thousands per year), give better control/access to archives, and ensure uptime (beyond internet outages).

    Setting up MDaemon in-house was a bit like passing a kidney stone. But after 3 months of tuning and re-tuning, it's running so smoothly and automatically I sometimes forget to check on it.

    Spice (21) flagReport
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  • Robert5205 wrote:

    I brought our email in-house to reduce cost (saved tens of thousands per year), give better control/access to archives, and ensure uptime (beyond internet outages).

    Setting up MDaemon in-house was a bit like passing a kidney stone. But after 3 months of tuning and re-tuning, it's running so smoothly and automatically I sometimes forget to check on it.

    I'm so glad I'm not the only one to sit and do the sums and decide that in-house isn't the source of all evil.  If it was taking me hours per week to maintain then I might move it into the cloud but right now I barely look at it.  If something goes wrong then it takes me longer to find the notes I haven't looked at for 2 years than it does to fix the issue.

    Spice (17) flagReport
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  • nickrenwick wrote:

    Prefer the in house nature of exchange on prem, but something has to be said for the ease and stability of O365 - well most of the time. 
    Think we are at O364 so far this year... 

    When getting the insane quotes for O365, I was tempted to ask if we could just get O261 since we don't work holidays or weekends. We stuck with on-prem. 

    Spice (20) flagReport
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  • MrTartan wrote:

    Robert5205 wrote:

    I brought our email in-house to reduce cost (saved tens of thousands per year), give better control/access to archives, and ensure uptime (beyond internet outages).

    Setting up MDaemon in-house was a bit like passing a kidney stone. But after 3 months of tuning and re-tuning, it's running so smoothly and automatically I sometimes forget to check on it.

    I'm so glad I'm not the only one to sit and do the sums and decide that in-house isn't the source of all evil.  If it was taking me hours per week to maintain then I might move it into the cloud but right now I barely look at it.  If something goes wrong then it takes me longer to find the notes I haven't looked at for 2 years than it does to fix the issue.

    Throw me in that club as well.  I can't imagine how much "in the cloud" would have cost me over the last 5 years alone, whereas my on-prem solution hasn't cost me an extra dime in licensing since 2012.

    Spice (7) flagReport
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  • Exchange on premise is ok but Exchange Online (O365) is far better and easier to manage.

    Spice (7) flagReport
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  • On prem, postfix && dovecot.  

    Sorry but having mail hosted by a company, makes no sense for us.  and that to the cost expenditure year over year..... the math and numbers did not lie.  cheaper and more reliable to host it our selves in house.

    Spice (1) flagReport
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  • Exchange on-prem all day. I used to manage a handful of various conglomerations of email services on linux, and recently was privy to an O365 deployment. There is nothing quite as functional for 1) Backups 2) permission control 3) ease of management and most importantly 4) price as on-prem Exchange. Of course, you need 50ish+ mailboxes/people to justify it over O365.

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  • O365 is the best in my opinion. G Suite would be a good second for small business with nothing too advanced. 

    Spice (2) flagReport
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  • Always a well studied, adventurous and trend setting approach from you! I am going to look into the daemon approach, as it would seem to be a perfect solution.

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  • If the SMB wants groupware then 365 is generally cheaper than on-prem once you've factored in the hardware, increasing storage and management time.  If they don't need integrated calendar/contacts/todo lists then postfix/dovecot is utterly unbeatable for reliability.  I've run them on my personal mail server for more than 10 years, I'll let you know when either crash.

    Spice (3) flagReport
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  • We used to use IPSwitch iMail as it was sold as a companion product for our ERP system.  We've dumped that and gone to O365 which has a lot more functionality and better support. 

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  • Well as O365 E1 cost us nothing, this is a no-brainer to me.
    Sometimes it's good to be a non-profit :D

    Spice (8) flagReport
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  • Because we have security restrictions for data being housed outside of our building our email has to be in-house.  Exchange is our choice.

    Spice (3) flagReport
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  • MrTartan wrote:

    Robert5205 wrote:

    I brought our email in-house to reduce cost (saved tens of thousands per year), give better control/access to archives, and ensure uptime (beyond internet outages).

    Setting up MDaemon in-house was a bit like passing a kidney stone. But after 3 months of tuning and re-tuning, it's running so smoothly and automatically I sometimes forget to check on it.

    I'm so glad I'm not the only one to sit and do the sums and decide that in-house isn't the source of all evil.  If it was taking me hours per week to maintain then I might move it into the cloud but right now I barely look at it.  If something goes wrong then it takes me longer to find the notes I haven't looked at for 2 years than it does to fix the issue.

    I was banging that drum on spiceworks a few years back.


    The fact is O365 is a good fit for some, and not such a good fit for others.  It's the job of the IT management team to do their homeowrk and work out which is most cost effective, which fits their security profile better, which will work best with any in-house systems etc etc, then choose.

    There is no one-size-fits-all answer for Exchange.

    Spice (5) flagReport
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  • I've only done Exchange and Office 365, so I don't have a fair base of comparison.  I will say though that I HIGHLY prefer 365 to on prem or hosted.

    Spice (2) flagReport
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  • j-sho wrote:

    nickrenwick wrote:

    Prefer the in house nature of exchange on prem, but something has to be said for the ease and stability of O365 - well most of the time. 
    Think we are at O364 so far this year... 

    When getting the insane quotes for O365, I was tempted to ask if we could just get O261 since we don't work holidays or weekends. We stuck with on-prem. 

    Oh I see what you did there. It's very clever.

    Spice (6) flagReport
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  • We have an on perm currently and With maintenance and licensing it is going to be smarter to go O365 due to the Exchange 2007 Server crashing.. 

    In 5 years we would Necessarily only be spending 11K on it after Not having to pay a MSP to monitor it (1200*5Years=6K for the MSP to just monitor it.)

    Where as it would cost us with paying an outside consultant to implement an refurbish server with exchange 25K in the 5 year run. (Includes 40 Users, Replacing office with 2016,Server)

    19*12.50*12*5years=$14250

    1*20*12*5Years=$1200

    5*5*12*5Years=$1500

    14250+1200+1500-6K=$10950

    Spice (2) flagReport
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  • Saw MDaemon on the list, and I must admit I cringed. Maybe it's our client, but we've had nothing but issues with that software.

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  • O365 is the most practical one, but I still prefer a good old Exchange server. Paying for each account we open annoys me, and Exchange worked much more seamlessly with an on-premise AD.

    G-Suite is a Fisher-Price solution compared to O365/Exchange.

    Spice (3) flagReport
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  • I've only ever used exchange (hosted) but I know some people working in smaller organizations that use 365 for convenience. That does not make them better it just is. I love these polls because it gives me a chance to see more options used all over the place.

    Spice (1) flagReport
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  • For a business that has no on-premise servers I'd go with Office 365, which is Exchange.  For larger businesses that have some servers but don't want to deal with the mail server I'd go with hosted Exchange.  When you outgrow that I'd bring Exchange in-house.

    Spice (3) flagReport
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  • Office 365 is good for everything but price. It's expensive but I'm happy not to have to backup or maintain the infrastructure. Got too much to do and my day can be better spent working on meaningful stuff.

    Spice (3) flagReport
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  • How in the hell does Domino have any votes?!

    Spice (5) flagReport
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  • Having used both Office 365 and G Suite in the work environment I honestly prefer G Suite.  Much easier from a management perspective and I feel Google is a leader in spam protection.

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  • I have used MDaemon and Exchange 2007/2010. Personally I liked MDaemon better but I do like Exchange being AD integrated.

    One less thing to have to manage.

    Spice (2) flagReport
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  • The answer is relative to the needs of the company, organization, and what they can afford, etc. no one solution fits all. I personally like Kerio Connect on site for over 15-20 uses but MS as dropped the price for O365 exchange which makes harder to justify using Kerio Connect onsite. 

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  • This is like comparing apples with full ploughmans lunches

    O365 unless you have a serious reason to keep it on prem and even then i would probably reccomend hybrid

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  • I think Microsoft will always take this one, their productivity products are unmatched, IMO. Especially exchange, it's so refined that it can be fit to pretty much any business model.

    The only caveat being the cost. Office 365 works better for small businesses, or large enterprises with big budgets. For SMBs, on premise is likely more attractive. Even for 200 users, you are looking at 18-20K per year out of operational spend - not an option for most SMBs with in house IT.

    Spice (1) flagReport
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  • I voted Exchange Hosted, but only bc I thought that was referencing O365 - to be fair, I didn't look that hard for O365, but that's what I'd go with lol

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  • Not even bothering to add this as an option, but we just finished transitioning from it and, given the deep scars this system caused to all involved, I can't help but whisper its name for the lulz ... firstclass ...

    That being said, G Suite has satisfied our needs for now. When I did run on prem in a past life it was of the postfix/dovecot/roundcube style and I was pleased with it. Again, as others have mentioned, the routine updates, backups, and tending to spam filtration was a fairly small portion of my day, way less than 5%, probably closer to 2%. It all depends on the fit between costs, privacy, experience, security, and infrastructure.

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  • No votes for Sendmail. Good. Good.

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  • You folks are making me feel better.  I have utilized every edition of Exchange from 5.0, to now 2016.  We are Exchange on prem.  My exchange server is the lifeblood of this company (and it makes me cringe when I think what is stored on it).  We just finished migrating from a physical 2010 Exchange to 2016 (yep I jumped a version).

    I argued with myself (as my own counsel) as to whether I should push hybrid, or O365 down the throat of the business.  We stand at 250 mailboxes... over 900GB of used storage, which ironically 50% is taken up by the top 15 mailboxes.  LOTS of email.

    I struggle to backup the server.. but since we finally migrated to 2016, I also put it on our Cisco UCS and virtualized into vSphere (for good or bad)... now I have better options for backup at least.

    Seeing all the votes for on prem Exchange makes me feel better about my decision.  We dealt with the pain of UC certs, mobile connectivity etc... and things have finally settled in again.  I'm happy to say this was 100% my own project and its working well (again), including integration with our Unity server for voicemail, and every flipping thing that sends through it (copiers, printers, etc).  What a PITA.

    Maybe I'll look at M365 in the near future, I dunno, but might work it with on prem still.

    Spice (3) flagReport
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  • SHNOOL wrote:

    ...

    I argued with myself (as my own counsel) as to whether I should push hybrid, or O365 down the throat of the business.  We stand at 250 mailboxes... over 900GB of used storage, which ironically 50% is taken up by the top 15 mailboxes.  LOTS of email.

    ...

    Let me warn you against the woes of a hybrid environment. It's ok for a spell, but you should not plan on staying there. Either stay on-prem or go all the way to the cloud. You will have headaches every week with a freakish hybrid env. Do lots of research. 

    Spice (2) flagReport
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  • In our practice, at this time, it makes much better sense to have Exchange on-premises.  Our few outages over the last several years have all been utility related; power fails or service provider failure.  When it makes fiscal or functional sense to do something different, I will. 

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  • I've managed the Microsoft option from Mail 5.0 all the way to Exchange 2016.  I have O365 and G-Suite customers.  I even managed a Groupwise system back in the day.  For stability, you really couldn't beat anything Novell made.

    These days, if it's my decision I have been recommending O365.  Not just for the Exchange service but for the dozens of other free services that companies don't even realize they need until they have them.  It really is a tremendous bang for the buck.  Plus, adding anything additional becomes a snap.  We have a few users that need access to BI so that is a simple add-on instead of having to buy a new version of the Office product in question.  Granted, you could say this is just Microsoft nickle-and-diming you to death but so far it has been a much bigger benefit than detriment.

    Spice (2) flagReport
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  • +1 for O365!

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  • O365 for sure, as we are all Windows/Office.  We had Exchange on-premise until last year when it finally crashed while we were in the process of slowly migrating everyone to O365.  The failure simply sped it up.  It is so much easier to configure and maintain, and the support is better, plus it's one less server to mess with; less headache for us in IT.

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  • I've managed many on-prem Exchange servers and always got terrified at the day a CU was released. I have been in situations where the entire Exchange instance has failed because of an update. I've also had a completely knackered Mailbox Store because of a power outage followed by a failed UPS, that was not pleasant either.

    With O365, I don't have to worry about any of that, this makes me happy!

    Spice (1) flagReport
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  • We use Gsuite, however we are about to make the swap to 365. Both are great options. 

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  • O365 here. We like it for ease of use and good security. We're held to HIPAA standards so we need to take extra care when it comes to how we communicate. We're also a non-profit so we we get ridiculously low pricing through TechSoup.

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  • Nothing beats Exchange. Whether that'd be hosted or on-prem would depend on how many users you have.

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  • Office 365 from a compliance stand point.

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