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  • Well  - I was the one who voted no on that, but humans always wanted to live forever so this does not surprise me. I prefer my memories die with me. I had a good run, and maybe next generation can do better.

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  • Seeing as how each time we recall a memory we change it in some minute way, I don't think we could ever get to a point where we could image a persons brain on that level.

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  • Altered carbon, altered carbon altered carbon.

    One lifetime just isn't enough.

    Pepper graySpice (12) flagReport
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  • As long as I don't get uploaded into the cloud

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  • Pictuelle wrote:

    Well  - I was the one who voted no on that, but humans always wanted to live forever so this does not surprise me. I prefer my memories die with me. I had a good run, and maybe next generation can do better.

    I too said no to that one. I'm wondering who said yes even if it means death? Perhaps it's because I watched the movie "The Lawnmower Man" LOL!

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  • deanmoncaster wrote:

    Altered carbon, altered carbon altered carbon.

    One lifetime just isn't enough.

    That was a really good book

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  • My brain backup would most likely fail as there are too many bad sectors in my brain.  I honestly believe there are some things we shouldn't do; brain backup is one of them.

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  • Its not the backup that worries me but rather the method of restoring the backup that gives me pause.

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  • I wouldn't backup my brain. What would be the purpose. Even if you could restore it you would lose everything from the time you made the backup to the time you restored.

    That might be ok for computers because you'll already know what was done in between, but if it were you're brain you would end up not even knowing what happened when it was done anyway.

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  • X-Files.

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  • deanmoncaster wrote:

    Altered carbon, altered carbon altered carbon.

    One lifetime just isn't enough.

    Fantastic show.

    Pepper graySpice (3) flagReport
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  • My read and write heads crashed a long time ago so there's definitely no backing up my brain...

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  • I tried to restore my brain to the last known good configuration. Date was 1994, so I passed. 

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  • I'd love tech that could restore memories to as if you are living them now. That would be amazing. 

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  • I can understand the desire to preserve the memories (its only human to want to survive) but this avenue of thought has so many potential negatives.

    How long would it be after this technology is developed before its used to steal memories - both in the name of the law and in breaking it. Look at the uproar over the Facebook data, this is on a whole other level. There's no account to delete here.

    Pepper graySpice (7) flagReport
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  • I'm with the post above, It's already known that memories are unreliable and often we change some details to fit with what we thought happened or block out bits to protect us from things that we don't want to remember. For that reason alone I don't see how it's possible to achieve an accurate "backup" of someone's mind.

    In addition to that, everyone has secrets, and given that the technology most likely won't allow for exclusions or "selective backups" there may be a lot of stuff backed up that you don't want your kids to see for example. How does one prevent such a thing, not that I have anything to hide of course.....

    That said I think there are moral questions to be raised here alongside the technical ones.

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  • I don't really care about backing up my own brain or essentially living forever but I think it would be good for some of the more brilliant scientific minds. It's possible that if this was already achievable, someone might have cured all diseases by now or advanced our technology even further than it is now.

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  • I'm not really sure why people think that a single snapshot is going to be good enough to reconstruct a lifetime process.

    The structure of the brain is only half of the puzzle. The model of uniform generic neurons is a convenient fiction at best.

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  • I personally think that Nectome might be able to claim a successful partial "backup" of someone's brain, but I will doubt that they would be able to read much of anything from it. It is one of those things that gives me the creeps that there might be a future where someone could hack into you brain backup and see all you memories or even take that backup and create a machine with your consciousness. It immediately makes me think of the scene from Captain America: The Winter Soldier where they find the Backup of Dr. Zola's brain.


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  • Its an interesting concept, scary at the same time. Recommend the movie Chappy that dwells a little bit into that.

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  • I'm a few neurons short of a cluster anyway so my backup would be a joke.

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  • I think this technology is inevitable in our near-future.  I fully believe it'll start with tech like this; mapping the connectome within the brain and being able to store or back them up.  Next will come the virtual "human body emulator" which can reconnect that data to active processing, inputs and outputs so that consciousness is reacquired in some form and interaction is possible again.  This will invariably lead to both external clients (robots) that they can control which interact with reality, and virtual clients which interact within a virtual reality - and there's no reason a person couldn't go back and forth between each. 

    Maybe in the farther future, we'll be able to grow new biological bodies and either control them with an electronic mind (androids) or re-imprint a natural brain with the connectome, but there's a good chance these will have limited appeal due to the risks - after all, you wouldn't suddenly decide to restore all your vital, mission-critical corporate data to a single mechanical hard drive just to have it experience being on a mechanical hard drive for a few years.  Best to stay virtual where improvements to the human body emulation, virtual realities and robotics will make the experience vastly superior and safer for all. 

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  • I'm less interested in preserving what's currently there for the future, and more interested in enhancing THIS life. Very little of my past I'd care to relive, to be honest... now if I could assimilate the world's knowledge and make it a better place as a result - now you have my attention.

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  • How would we know if the Singularity was already here ???
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  • One lifetime is plenty to know that I don't want to live forever.

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  • Methuselah lived 900 years... 

    but who calls that livin', 
    when no gal will give in,
    to no man who's 900 years...?!

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  • Perhaps at some point we will be at the stage where we can restore memory, but if it's 50+ years from now, will anyone else be around to verify that it's actually you? What if you're 5% your memories and 95% AI based on the environments in the memories? How would the backup software scale with future technology if it relies on current technology and what are the security concerns? What if hackers inject a code that causes empathy to be bypassed and you're just a war machine shell of something that used to be human? That sounds worse than death.

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  • If my consciousness gets uploaded to the Office 365 cloud, and Microsoft borks the admin log-in, how will I know that it has been borked?  Will I just FEEL that they've borked it??

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  • deanmoncaster wrote:

    Altered carbon, altered carbon altered carbon.

    One lifetime just isn't enough.

    Altered Carbon was such a good look into what backing up and restoring memories into a new body would look like. Of course, this is hundreds of years into the future, but I still think it highlighted the core issues really well.

    To the actual question, I don't think that we'll see this technology in 10 years or even in the next 50 years, but it may be possible after that.

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  • Eeveen wrote:

    deanmoncaster wrote:

    Altered carbon, altered carbon altered carbon.

    One lifetime just isn't enough.

    That was a really good book

    The show had started off great, nice flying in the pilot episode - and then it slowed down to a crawl, as if it's going to be a 200-episode-soap-opera, blah. The guns in the hotel had poor CGI, nicely made, but the ideas for the looks and animation are pretty weak... Like, as if made by someone who has never read about, or seen Sci-Fi in their lives; pretty disappointing in the end, heh.

    EDIT: Oh, yeah and as far as being digitized: try laying in bed, but without moving a muscle - at all, completely still, for like an hour and then imagine that endless experience... It could be the most horrifying torture, ever created by man. xD

    (Or, the other way round, never having to eat, sleep - not needing anything, ever. What would you end up wanting.)

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  • kgbme wrote:

    The show had started off great, nice flying in the pilot episode - and then it slowed down to a crawl, as if it's going to be a 200-episode-soap-opera, blah. The guns in the hotel had poor CGI, nicely made, but the ideas for the looks and animation are pretty weak... Like, as if made by someone who has never read about, or seen Sci-Fi in their lives; pretty disappointing in the end, heh.

    EDIT: Oh, yeah and as far as being digitized: try laying in bed, but without moving a muscle - at all, completely still, for like an hour and then imagine that endless experience... It could be the most horrifying torture, ever created by man. xD

    (Or, the other way round, never having to eat, sleep - not needing anything, ever. What would you end up wanting.)

    Forget the movie...read the books or get them on audiobooks ( narrator does a good job)! :)  The Netflix show is a sanitized version for the average "bison". 

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  • Pictuelle wrote:

    Well  - I was the one who voted no on that, but humans always wanted to live forever so this does not surprise me. I prefer my memories die with me. I had a good run, and maybe next generation can do better.

    Definitely this!

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  • Let's say your brain was backed up, but there was an earthquake and you weren't properly backed up.  All the data that was you gets irrecoverably lost.  Would the company hosting you be responsible for manslaughter by negligence?  If your brain backup wasn't being used, then you're just a lost coma patient, I guess, but it's even worse if your brain is actively in use when this occurs.  There are some weird ethical dilemmas regarding the humanity of a brain backup that I think would become very complicated.

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  • I'm all for it. Of course, I'm envisioning a system like the Bobiverse books where I get a sweet VR and can control machines etc.

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  • That 53% will drop sharply when the pricing is published!

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  • the Animus will be real?

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  • Eeveen wrote:

    deanmoncaster wrote:

    Altered carbon, altered carbon altered carbon.

    One lifetime just isn't enough.

    That was a really good book

    I judged that book by its cover and i liked the cover i liked the book, read it the week it was released, really good! :D I quite like the tv show but still haven't finished it!

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  • 86 Billion neurons, but there are well over a quadrillion interconnections. Furthermore, it is speculated the timing of the neurons firing and the actual pulse of energy itself, contain information. So unlike a simple electrical connection, the length and makeup of the connection plays a role in the information storage.  Like a server room with a quadrillion interconnections, hundreds of different cabling and communication protocols and which can also rewire itself on the fly.  Not to mention there may still may be more to what we are then simple physical hardware.  A concept which is difficult to prove or disprove, with physical hardware.

    My prediction is the first person booted from the type of backup they are talking about, would be stark, raving, gibbering mad.

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  • The snapshot of death seems a bit aggressive.  I wouldn't mind reviewing my syslog though...

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  • My initial reaction to the original article was - No way! But i suppose I might consider it, only if it wouldn't kill me. And probably only after a lot of others had gone first. Definitely not an experiment I would want to be the first to try out. 

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  • Big problem would arise if the brain backup was in a proprietary format that could not be read on a standard computer, and the only restore option was to the original location.

    In that case, you have the choice if living with some brain corruption or else gambling everything on the backup being OK.

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  • This will be useless until we find out how a brain does actually work. 

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  • grantnoturbus wrote:

    My prediction is the first person booted from the type of backup they are talking about, would be stark, raving, gibbering mad.

    They made a movie about something similar in 1931... Frankenstein?

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  • I think that we won't reach that level within 10 years, I think in the future, ruling it out as a possibility is a bit ludicrous, look how far we've come in the past 100 years. Humans are still unaware/ignorant to a lot of things, which is why scientific advancements will continue to happen.

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  • RBO6036 wrote:

    Its an interesting concept, scary at the same time. Recommend the movie Chappy that dwells a little bit into that.

    I loved Chappie!

    Die Antwoord was brilliant in that movie as well.

    -

    Quote from the movie:

    Deon: I can't save you, Chappie. The problem is much greater than your battery.

    Chappie: Why?

    Deon: Because you are conscious. You can't be copied because you're not data. We don't know what consciousness is, so we cannot move it.


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  • I've seen too many episodes of Black Mirror to want a backup of my brain floating around somewhere. 

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  • Sure, some Doctors and Scientists know how a brain works, or at least part of it.  But they just know bits and pieces, right?  How does this company expect to get working backups of our brain, when we are still exploring and gathering new findings every day?

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  • Jambory wrote:

    I can understand the desire to preserve the memories (its only human to want to survive) but this avenue of thought has so many potential negatives.

    How long would it be after this technology is developed before its used to steal memories - both in the name of the law and in breaking it. Look at the uproar over the Facebook data, this is on a whole other level. There's no account to delete here.

    You can change your own memories fairly easily. All you have to do is believe that it happened a certain way, then fill in the blanks, and then before long, your brain has a visualization of the event unique to your brain. It could have been of an event that never happened. It could have been to hide another memory. 
    I have this wonderful "Auto-Archive" feature built into my brain, so that any information that I haven't used or reused with the intent of modifying, in the last few minutes I completely forget. 

    I feel like if there was a FULL brain backup, this would be different than memory backups. A full brain backup would have to be fully restored even if you want to just pluck a few memories. That would mean creating a VP(Virtual Person) in Virtualbox and asking it questions, allowing it to answer on its own, or forcibly digging through memories that are ever changing and always being modified and moved, which would be impossible even with indexing. If there was a backup of JUST memories, then you again are taking the individuals memory from their head, and it could have been modified, deleted, corrupted, or all kinds of things between the memory extraction and the event. Neither approach would be remotely useful in court, so law enforcement would have no right to it. Stealing memories would be an issue if you kept important memories stored unencrypted, or you kept the encryption memory unencrypted next to it as a way to remember the password.. because that would be the next generation of user's sticky notes. Black mirror? Heck yeah, but I would still back up my memories. I would do it every day religiously, because I have absolutely no memory of my own. 

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  • Why would I want to hang around this rock one second more than I have to.  Besides, who says the future wants someone like me around.

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