Home
Join

153 Replies

  • If you plug in a USB floppy drive it will come up as A:.  A second USB floppy will come up as B:.

    Pepper graySpice (29) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • No. No need and no point. Finite number of directly connected devices and UNC paths work better for shares.

    Pepper graySpice (19) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I have done it in a pinch, but don't recommend it.  I actually did it once to get REALLY old software to run on a newer system.

    If you need to use those letters for drive mapping you have bigger issues you need to address IMO.  I think the most mapped drives I ever had for one group was 12... and it was pruned down to 8 with a little better planning.

    Pepper graySpice (28) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Nah. I mean sure you could, but I don't.
    Not counting D-J or whatever the first few are that get used, I use S, T, and Z mostly... :)

    Pepper graySpice (6) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I'm all for minimal mapped drives - if its user focussed, then a mapped drive makes life easier, but if its system focused and supports it, then any share change usually stays as a UNC

    Pepper graySpice (7) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I start at Z: and work my way backwards.

    Pepper graySpice (40) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I mostly follow the Z and work backwards idea, but a couple places I've worked previously used S as their storage (because S stands for storage) and couldn't handle it when their S drive moved so I left it.
    One of those places also used T (probably because it is after S?) so I left it. Small price to pay for less complaints from the users.

    Pepper graySpice (12) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Mike400 wrote:

    If you plug in a USB floppy drive it will come up as A:.  A second USB floppy will come up as B:.

    I do not even see shops selling anymore floppies....I cannot imagine what to save in a 1MB drive....

    Maybe in Windows 11...they will remove A: & B: altogether...

    Pepper graySpice (4) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • If it auto assigns A: or B:, sure I'll use it, if I have the choice to give if a drive letter, I would not use either.

    Pepper graySpice (5) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • No we don't and to be honest never really thought about it. I have been in IT so long A: was always for floppy drives so it never registered that it is no longer used.

    Pepper graySpice (10) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I've used B: for .cmd files that needed network access. Setup the drive, do work & then tear down. Worked just fine.

    For day to day use?  Nope.  Most software these days should be able to handle UNC paths. Add DFS namespaces into that and really no need.

    Pepper graySpice (4) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I work with SQL Server, and all of my servers have C: system drive, S: install drive, and the rest are mountpoints mounted on C:.

    Pepper graySpice (6) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • +1 for mount points!  I love having 1.25TB of space on my 256GB SSD.

    Pepper graySpice (9) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Never had anyone who had enough drives (physical or mapped) to require using them.

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I have an external FD, so I leave A & B for that device.

    I should have mentioned earlier that the only reason I have the ext FD is to be able to copy some data off of a few 3.5 floppies that I recently discovered in a box.

    Pepper graySpice (2) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • rolandstoller wrote:

    I have an external FD, so I leave A & B for that device3.

    I have one as well but just realized, now that you mentioned this, that I haven't used it in probably 10 years... Hmmm.
    Pepper graySpice (6) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I don't use the A: or B: just to avoid confusion for old timers like myself. With some exceptions anything you have saved on "floppy" is unusable. 

    Pepper graySpice (2) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • B is for Backup, Baby!

    Pepper graySpice (31) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • *Start Archer voice*

    Do you want to confuse everyone? Because mapping something other than a floppy to A: or B: is how you confuse everyone!

    *End Archer voice*

    Pepper graySpice (22) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • A: and B: are sacred locations where only floppies and fond memories are allowed to exist.

    Pepper graySpice (51) flagReport
    1 found this helpful thumb_up thumb_down
  • I like mounting my backup disks as B drive.  As for confusing people, when was the last time you had a floppy disk in your system - this argument is like putting "Unleaded fuel only" on your gas tank...  

    Pepper graySpice (14) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Aarond5 wrote:

    I mostly follow the Z and work backwards idea, but a couple places I've worked previously used S as their storage (because S stands for storage) and couldn't handle it when their S drive moved so I left it.
    One of those places also used T (probably because it is after S?) so I left it. Small price to pay for less complaints from the users.

    I had to read this 4 times before it got through that you didn't leave the job, you left the drive mappings.  Wow, I need some caffeine.
    Pepper graySpice (23) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • As far as I am concerned, A stands for "Avoid", and B stands for "Busted" as in if you use this letter something will be busted.  I have had issues in the past where those drive letters were taken up by something else and caused shortcut errors and other issues.  We also run legacy systems that still have traces of code that referenced those drives, so we can't have anything with those drive letters or the software just fails.

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I do Z and back if possible but some sites prefer H for Home, S for Storage or Share, Q for Quickbooks etc.

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • A and B drive letters act like reserved letters. Even when you map to them, Windows often thinks they are physical floppy drives and can spit up errors.

    Pepper graySpice (3) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Yes. All the time. I don't remember the last time I've used a floppy drive, internal or USB. That ended years ago for me. 

    Pepper graySpice (3) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • It's rare but I've done it.   Had one piece of software that ran under terminal services, but when exporting data it had to go to the A: drive.   The company wanted like $1200 to make a change so they could enter a path.  So of course I disabled the physical A: and mapped it under their login script.     

    Pepper graySpice (2) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Its just a letter man.

    No reason to give it any undue reverence.

    Storage drives will take the letters A and B just as easy as E and F.

    I never give it any real thought, I just go into them and find what I am looking for.
     
    Pepper graySpice (4) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • It bugs our other techs, but when I setup BDR servers, my favorite is to use B: for the [B]ackup storage drive.

    Pepper graySpice (6) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Fun Fact, and I know this by experience...

    If you map Flash Drives to A: or B: to make your users lives a little easier when transitioning from floppies, and you hook up your Garmin unit, and you try and update the firmware, the Garmin firmware updater will not work if your Garmin flash is on A: or B:


    Pepper graySpice (3) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I only discovered I could map non-floppy volumes to A or B a few years ago (I know, I know). Since my personal revelation, I do it quite often now. It's uncommon in my most recent positions that I come across older software to support or a need to plug in USB floppy drives, so the way I see it, A and B are up for grabs. That being said, some compelling cases here for not doing it. I think I'll continue doing it unless I run into a strong use case to not do so.

    Awesome poll today!

    Pepper graySpice (3) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Never felt the need to change this. A, B and C are effectively always ear marked but you effectively have another 23 Drive letters to use. The most I have personally seen was 15 and it was not exactly efficient setup.

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I didn't do it but the SQL guy did. He created a B: disk for dumping SQL backups to.
    One list of A: and B: floppy quirks. If you have a floppy, and access A; from command line, then select B: you will still be asked to remove the disk from A: floppy and insert a second disk into A: as B:.
     
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • We have a network drive that maps to Q:  Which is the letter that is given to the restore partition on some Lenovo's.  So when we set those up we change the restore to B:

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I like using B for Backups sometimes, never touch A though

    Pepper graySpice (2) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I just never thought of it other than the vague idea it could cause problems. Plenty of spare letters so better left alone I say.

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Our A:ustralia server, for those here in the states, gets mapped as such!

    Pepper graySpice (3) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • There is a reason Diesel pumps are different size

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I worked for an insurance company once where the Corporate Controller had drives mapped to every single letter of the alphabet (except C: and D: which was her optical drive).  I discovered this when she asked to have a network location mapped so she didn't have to click through so many folders.  Apparently she had requested this several times from my predecessor and he just mapped everything she asked for.

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • The Glorious Morris wrote:

    when transitioning from floppies, ...

    Who hasn't finished transitioning from floppies??
    Pepper graySpice (5) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • NOPE.

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I haven't been around long enough to even know that A and B were for FD's :D :D :D :D

    Pepper graySpice (6) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I assign drive letters that correspond to the purpose of the drive, S for the scan drive. P for personal drives. I assign "A" to assholes. My little middle finger to people that irritate me. 

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • If the situation presents itself I will.  I would only do it on virtual servers that I have removed the floppy device on anyways.  

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • None of the above. But if you plug in an external floppy drive (I did have one of these) pretty sure it will default to A:

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • jamesd2 wrote:

    No. No need and no point. Finite number of directly connected devices and UNC paths work better for shares.

    Yes and no. Some software like AutoDesk don't like using UNC paths and they can break other things but they are much more secure as many vulnerabilities (such as CryptoLocker, one of the nasty Ransomware software's out there) have not adopted parsing them yet. So I'd just say each environment is different, but generally I wouldn't expect people to use the A: or B: paths. 

    But it might be better than using a low drive letters (such as D or E) as a mount point for a network share as USB devices will commonly get hidden behind the network drive of the same letter (as Windows is not smart enough to determine the letter is in use by either subst or net use). Also, I agree with many other users in that it's nice to use drive letters that make sense, like S: (Software), H: (Home), etc.

    Best,

    Micheal

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I have used it for Citrix Servers and for batch files that require drives that I don't expect to already be in use.

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • ya, been doing that since  XP and up


    the first time I did it was with a 7-Port USB hub
     I kept adding drives until I had only B:\ remaining

    and voila the next USB device attached received B:\

    now I always have a specific / preferred device set as B:\

    Pepper graySpice (2) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • Like a few people here I work from Z: up for mapped drives.   When transferring from one source to a target I sometimes map S: and T: as D: is my second SSD.  I just find it A: B:other to deal those letters.  As for backups, well we have backup software installed already, and anything that isn't backed up that way, I use external Drives.

    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down
  • I've occasionally used it to map a flash drive or something of that nature, but not as the norm. I use it at home for an external hard drive that houses all my backups on my Plex server. I occasionally  change the drive letters on my kid's laptop just to screw with him.

    Pepper graySpice (1) flagReport
    Was this post helpful? thumb_up thumb_down

Read these next...