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  • The ideal temp is as cool as possible without being too cold to create moisture in the air. All server rooms and kit are different and what other equipment is in there will affect what temperature it should be. As long as your equipment isn't failing or flashing warnings at you then you should be ok until the aircon is fixed.

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  • Each server and other equipment should have its operating conditions listed. However, these are generally pretty broad. I try to keep my server room below 70F.

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  • Keep the temp sub 70 degrees if you can, with some type of humidity controlling system to keep moisture to a tolerable.. 60% +/- 5 % range.. 

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  • we have all our servers, routers/switches, UPS systems (Big ones) , telephony etc. in one room. 
     
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  • 69F serviced by 4 tonnes capacity worth of A/C equipment.

    And a backup unit that barely is enough when that craps out.

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  • I keep ours sitting at around 65 and it is humidity controlled. If we were to have both the primary and backup AC units fail and power and generator fail then the servers can stay running the 60 minutes the UPS lasts without over heating. each of our AC units can cool the room to the 65 on their own. We have 2 for redundancy and every month I switch with one is the redundant one so I know they work. I do not like to have the servers run hot but I have a friend that keeps his room siting around 75 because his ac comes from the building AC and the ladies that have officeis around the data center share the same AC shaft and do not want to have it blowing 65 in their offices. He has been running 75 for years without having a problem and he seems to last longer before the temp gets to high but I believe it is because he is ground floor (3 story building), in the center of the floor, up north US. I am as far south continental US you can go on the 2nd floor of a 2 story building. For the majority of the year we are in the 90s with many times hitting 100s so the building heats up fast when the AC goes down.

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  • How hot was it?  It must have been roasting if things shut down.  Mine stays around 76.  

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  • We like to keep it at 22 Celcius. 

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  • Ours stays around 68.

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  • Bryan Doe wrote:

    How hot was it?  It must have been roasting if things shut down.  Mine stays around 76.  

    one of the temp air-conditioning unit failed overnight, so we arrived this morning and It was like you're in an engine room of a medium size ship.
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  • We keep ours at 64. Never had any issues with moisture or static.

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  • pgeric wrote:

    We like to keep it at 22 Celcius. 

    isn't that still hot? I am thinking of around 10 to 15 celcius.
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  • HGMPL wrote:

    pgeric wrote:

    We like to keep it at 22 Celcius. 

    isn't that still hot? I am thinking of around 10 to 15 celcius.
    That's still less than 72F.
    Ours stays within 68 - 72 year round.  It's a small room too.  Lovely to duck into during the summer months when the building is hot.  "Me?  I'm.... uh....  just checking the servers..."
     
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  • Google runs 95 F with lots of air flow. The colo we have our main servers runs at 74 F. The little server room/office I stay in is set for 72 F but runs anywhere between 65 F and 88 F with alarms at 80 F and 90 F.

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  • We aim for ~75F, no need to waste energy keeping it freezing cold, the equipment is perfectly happy.

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  • Upper 60s ambient air.  Measure the temperature away from the equipment.  The top of the equipment racks shouldn't exceed the max temperature rating for any piece of equipment in that rack.

    Warm enough to avoid condensation.

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  • ITWatchDogs says optimal is 68-71F. N

    http://www.itwatchdogs.com/environmental-monitoring-news/data-center/determining-the-best-server-roo...

    Justin7819 wrote:

    Google runs 95 F with lots of air flow. The colo we have our main servers runs at 74 F. The little server room/office I stay in is set for 72 F but runs anywhere between 65 F and 88 F with alarms at 80 F and 90 F.

    Doesn't Microsoft keep their datacenters really warm, too?
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  • HGMPL wrote:

    pgeric wrote:

    We like to keep it at 22 Celcius. 

    isn't that still hot? I am thinking of around 10 to 15 celcius.
    I'd really worry about condensation at 10C.
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  • Ours is about 68 to 72 on average. 

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  • Ours tend to stay around the 10 - 15^C mark 

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  • 68 to 72 F is my ideal server room temperature and Humidity sensor. 

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  • Drives last longer if it isn't too cold.
    All HP servers are rated for 35°C, some can go to 45°C and still be within warranty.
    http://h20566.www2.hpe.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?sp4ts.oid=7481830&docLocale=en_US&docId=emr_na-c04513664

    15 to 20 °C sounds way to cold.

    20 to 25°C is comfortable for you and works well with most recent equipment.
    Tape is perhaps different, but I don't use it.
    (68 to 77 of "that other temperature scale")

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  • HGMPL wrote:

    Bryan Doe wrote:

    How hot was it?  It must have been roasting if things shut down.  Mine stays around 76.  

    one of the temp air-conditioning unit failed overnight, so we arrived this morning and It was like you're in an engine room of a medium size ship.
    Default HP server (G9) does not shut down at 116.6°F / 47°C
    Do not ask me how I know
    But you can set the tresholds in the bios, or atleast you could. We run mostly default settings anyway.

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  • We keep ours at a brisk 68F

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  • I can't set mine to anything under 74 unless I want the AC unit to fail. :-/

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  • Ours is set for right around 68 - we recently added a temperature monitor right in front of the air unit that sends an alert to me and maintenance when it appears the room gets above 80. 

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  • Modern equipment should be fine in the 70s F. It can actually go higher, but that isn't too comfortable for the humans.

    Too cold wastes significantly electricity, increases data center costs; reduces profitability, bonuses, funding for beer AND bacon; and is killing polar bears and penguin.

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  • We keep ours at 78F

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  • 68-70, any lower taxes the cooling units pretty heavily and may result in premature failure.  We have temp sensor alarms that notifies IT if it hits 80 in the room. 

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  • As cold as you can without overloading the Aircon you have available.

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  • We have two aircon units both setup to 20C. It's an optimal temperature they can keep and switch off periodically.

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  • Get 2x AC units with the heat being released outside.  Leave them both on 24/7

    Spec each AC unit to be able to handle the load on it's own.

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  • The Ideal Server room temperature must not be less than 17C. it is best to maintain this temperature to avoid  moist and dust inside the room 

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  • I maintain 65 F in front of the racks.  Behind the racks is something in the 80+ F range.

    My server room has no outside air exchange, it is on an isolated system.  In case of failure of that system I can place roll around units on the cool side of the rack and have them vent into the plenum of the rest of the building.  At that point I do have to leave the server room door open to prevent a negative pressure situation.

    When the A/C went down in my DR location I was told it couldn't be fixed for two weeks.  I kinda sorta blew up and told them if I had to run that equipment without A/C they could pay for the failures and downtime.  It was fixed in 14 hours.

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  • We have 3 Sensors monitored and managed by NetBotz 250

    1 wireless sensor close to the AC system, 1 sensor in the room and the last one close to the rack

    So the temp is between 55 F and 64 F

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  • If you have a drop down ceiling (grid with tiles) AND you have a plenum ceiling, you can vent the portable floor units up above grid with duct work. If you have return vents for your HVAC units that use duct work you cant.

    Around 72deg is fine. I've seen folks crank down the thermostat on a mini-split AC unit and cause repeated freeze ups in cold weather. For AC longevity, set the thermostat to a cool but attainable temperature. That way the AC can cycle off now and then. We utilize temp and humidity monitoring too so it's easy to track the effectiveness of the thermostat settings. 

    -A

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  • 76F +/-2F and not too dry...  50% relative humidity. +/- 5%... 

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  • We target 70F but I am happy with anything 65-75F

    Temps can get a little wild here in Southern Minnesota, we try and use a economizer in the winter months to help cut down the costs of cooling.

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  • Ours stay around 70° - 74°F.  Years ago before it was monitored, we had the AC unit in one server room crap out over the weekend.  I came in Monday morning to a server room with lots of beeps and buzzers going off and opening the door felt like opening a portal to hell. It was  a bit over 130°F and we had lost one switch.  Modern gear is usually made to be pretty tolerant of temperatures.

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  • Our's are kept at ~20-23'C. We have had the aircons fail and the room get to a brisk 35'C, by that time I was shutting down non-essential servers just to lessen the heat build up. 

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  • 69 because Gronk said so.

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  • You're not really keeping your server room cold. You're using a heat pump to transfer heat from inside the room to somewhere else.

    The question to ask is not "what temperature should my server room be," but "how much heat do I need to remove so the equipment continues to operate properly."

    There is a depraved fascination with making server rooms colder than they need be. Most equipment is limited to a maximum inlet temp of 95F. Turn off your AC and monitor your inlet temperature. See how long it takes until you reach 90F. Then, adjust your room temp to give you the desired non-cooled run time.

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  • When I started here they kept it at 62 F, but I changed it to 66-68 F.

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  • Robert5205 wrote:

    You're not really keeping your server room cold. You're using a heat pump to transfer heat from inside the room to somewhere else.

    The question to ask is not "what temperature should my server room be," but "how much heat do I need to remove so the equipment continues to operate properly."

    There is a depraved fascination with making server rooms colder than they need be. Most equipment is limited to a maximum inlet temp of 95F. Turn off your AC and monitor your inlet temperature. See how long it takes until you reach 90F. Then, adjust your room temp to give you the desired non-cooled run time.

    You are indeed using a heat pump to transfer heat, but you are doing so to maintain a certain inlet temperature (whatever you determine that should be) at the front of the rack.  And as you pointed out, perhaps some allowance for temperature rise in case of an A/C failure.  In my case a 65F inlet temperature translates to a 90+ exhaust temperature.

    My office is two doors down and across the hall from the server room and while the server might accept an inlet temperature of 95 F and continue to run I certainly don't want it running anywhere near that temperature because it sounds like I am sitting next to a jet aircraft when the inlet temperature gets above about about 77 F.  By the time it is 85 F I think it is about to take off.  At 65 F inlet temperature within 10 minutes of a power failure or A/C failure my inlet temp will be at 80+.  In another 5 - 10 minutes the inlet side of the room will rise to 90+ and either shutdown or supplemental cooling will need to be added to continue operation.

    While I know many data centers run under the premise that hotter is better, I tend to look at things differently for a small server room.  When we moved offices 10 years ago I came from a 1 rack server room that was maintained at about 80 F and moved to a 3 rack server room maintained at 65 F (Inlet side).  My hard drive failure rate dropped dramatically with that change.  Sure for a data center it makes since to maintain a higher cold aisle temperature and replace more hard drives, but in my 3 rack server room I want reliability not power conservation.

    I don't think I have a depraved fascination  with making server rooms colder than they need to be.  I want to maintain the equipment in an environment that will allow the company to get the most return out of there server dollars because while I would like to be on a 5 year replacement cycle it is invariably stretched to at least 7.  In fact last Friday I took a PowerEdge 2950 out of service that was 10 years old.  :)

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  • Honestly, how many of you have lost servers because the temp in the room was a scathing 72 degrees? I mean really. There are bigger fish for IT to fry.

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  • I'm dumbfounded why we're still using Fahrenheit at this age.

    Anyway, we keep our temperature at 17c.

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  • just as long as it is cool enough to keep the fans from taking off and is stable!
    balance between wasting power and having things run nicely really. Have the room comfortable to work in is my rule!

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  • HGMPL wrote:

    pgeric wrote:

    We like to keep it at 22 Celcius. 

    isn't that still hot? I am thinking of around 10 to 15 celcius.
    That is mainframe era ... waste of energy cooling it that low with modern gear.
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  • jsantonio wrote:

    I'm dumbfounded why we're still using Fahrenheit at this age.

    Anyway, we keep our temperature at 17c.

    we sit around 18.5/19 .. we use 3 pretty simple high quaility domestic units
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  • Kader_Mtl wrote:

    We have 3 Sensors monitored and managed by NetBotz 250

    1 wireless sensor close to the AC system, 1 sensor in the room and the last one close to the rack

    So the temp is between 55 F and 64 F

    You are 100% doing it wrong, that's totally unnecessary and a waste of electricity, and your RH is stupid low and you're running into the area where static thrives.


    We keep ours in the low 70's when we're in there, and upper 70's to keep the fans quiet when we're not in there. When we build out our new room that isn't near anyone, we'll let it run in the low 80's unoccupied and let the fans run a little faster. Target RH of around 55%. I don't typically check it until I know it's super dry out.

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