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  • aliqamar wrote:

    won't it hurt a lot of people if it gets banned with the illegal label on it?

    Oh come on, it's pretty obvious that a box which runs software that can access pay for content for free isn't doing so legally. If people can't figure that out then maybe they need to have the law book thrown at them to knock some sense into them.
    Spice (71) flagReport
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  • I was at a buddy's house who had this app on his computer and was trying to show his kids a video. He briefly opened an application to restart it, which I immediately recognized as a proxy.

    "Why are you trying to hide your ip address?" I asked him.

    He told me to shut up. Lol.

     
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  • Well, if they're going to let you access paid content for free then that's illegal.  Kodi itself is fine, but the Addams that let you access stuff you shouldn't isn't Fine.

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  • I read a thread somewhere where even the Kodi people are upset about these boxes being sold.  Seems people who have bought these are coming into the Kodi community complaining when they quit working. 

    Not to mention, I don't like the idea of people profiting from the reselling these boxes preloaded with a bunch of illegal addons. 

    Personally, I like Kodi a lot (without the illegal addons).  If the software itself remains legal, and they are just going after the people building these boxes, I don't think I'm opposed to that.

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  • How do you use Kodi with legal content besides free-to-air TV? My understanding is that even the DVD backups of movies you use aren't legal. What service offers a way to purchase movies/series that you download and store as media files?

    You lot need to stop defending the stupidity that is copyright laws. It is now proven that offering reasonably priced services for media content is the best way to have people pay for their content. Outlawing illicit means of accessing content does sweet FA.

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  • Simon Matthews wrote:

    How do you use Kodi with legal content besides free-to-air TV? My understanding is that even the DVD backups of movies you use aren't legal. What service offers a way to purchase movies/series that you download and store as media files?

    You lot need to stop defending the stupidity that is copyright laws. It is now proven that offering reasonably priced services for media content is the best way to have people pay for their content. Outlawing illicit means of accessing content does sweet FA.

    Home movies? Music? Photos? Playing actual discs? Kodi has plenty of uses that don't violate copyright law or the DMCA. To be clear, I'm not defending copyright law, just pointing out the other uses of the software.
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  • If Kodi was used for only these legal uses it would be a hunk of junk that never got updated because no-one would care about it.

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  • I'm going to guess people that use pre-built Kodi boxes for illegal content only buy them for that, and don't care what Kodi itself is.  People who have never heard of Kodi or Kodi boxes and read the headlines as "Kodi is illegal" won't know the difference or ever hear of Kodi again.  And those of us that know what Kodi and don't use add-ons or buy it pre-installed won't care because we know what's really the issue here.  If someone broadly labels Kodi as illegal it's missing the point.

    It drives me insane when I see friends on Facebook asking about cutting the cord.  I chime in that I have an antenna and so on, and then 5-10 of their idiot friends carry on about how they have a Firestick with Kodi and can get movies still in theaters, yet never stop to think what might be wrong with that.

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  • Bryan Doe wrote:

    It drives me insane when I see friends on Facebook asking about cutting the cord.  I chime in that I have an antenna and so on, and then 5-10 of their idiot friends carry on about how they have a Firestick with Kodi and can get movies still in theaters, yet never stop to think what might be wrong with that.

    And then cinemas should also stop to think that the price they charge to see a movie is beyond ridiculous and drives more people to access content illegally.
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  • Maybe in some places....here I pay $7.50 for a matinee, where I can reserve my seat and depending on the theater get an electric recliner.  I hate junk food so that trap isn't a problem.  And I don't go that often so under eight bucks is okay with me.   Is that a lot lower than normal, or am I just wrong in thinking it isn't bad?

    Even if it is, if I couldn't afford it, I'm not pirating it.  Honestly though I'm not entirely sure that's why it's so common.

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  • Is that USD$7.50? I find that to still be a little bit too expensive. There are no good options for cinema viewing like there is for streaming. Where are the subscription deals for cinemas? $10 a month all the movies you want (booking required) would be great. They will still charge moronic amounts for the lobby food.

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  • USD$7.50 is expensive? Here it's £12 so count yourself lucky.

    At the end of the day you have two choices. To break the law or not. If you break it then you may end up getting caught.

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  • I agree with you, particularly!

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  • Kodi is perfectly legal and safe. I use it every day via LibreELEC on a Odroid C2 (brilliant device). It's up to you to actively choose to load some dodgy build with a load of addons that break Kodi's principles.

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  • Whilst I am not arguing the widespread (and let's not take the holier-than-thou attitude here, it is widespread) use of these boxes is illegal, it could be argued that it is driven by the crazy high price of satellite TV which is itself driven by the stupidly high price the TV companies are willing to pay for Sport rights to out-do each other.

    Last year I noticed I was paying approx £80/month to Sky TV so I cut Sports and Movies which brought it down to £34/month, with that saving I bought myself a new camera as I would rather be outside taking photos than watching TV.  What I am left with is about 89% rubbish TV and maybe 1% good stuff like Sky Atlantic, the other 10% I could get on Freeview anyway.

    The nearest Cinema to me is Aberdeen which is 40 miles away.  So a trip to the Cinema for 2 people would be a 3-4 hour affair with food and fuel, probably cost about £50-£60.  If we still had one in my home town I would go more often.

    I have a Kodi box but have not switched it on for months, I found it irritating to use with constant updates etc. so if it is made illegal, I won't shed a tear.

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  • Gary D Williams wrote:

    aliqamar wrote:

    won't it hurt a lot of people if it gets banned with the illegal label on it?

    Oh come on, it's pretty obvious that a box which runs software that can access pay for content for free isn't doing so legally. If people can't figure that out then maybe they need to have the law book thrown at them to knock some sense into them.
    Just to be clear, neither Kodi nor any of the addons have ANY software features that gives access to paid content for free. The illegal pirated stream is readily available on the internet and someone just made an addon for Kodi to access that stream from nice sofa&remote friendlty interface. Kodi or the addon developers are not responsible of that. Just head to piratedmoviestreamofyourchoice.com and start streaming, they probably have a web player too.

    Only thing the Kodi addon does is open this link from the internet and stream it. ANY media player can do it. ANY browser can do it. Well, actually Kodi cannot do it, but you can make addons with that feature.

    Opening a link is not some special Kodi-related software feature. Kodi is just one media player among others. Just with arguably the best interface for remote control use.

    So what is illegal here is the box sellers advertising that they give you free content by sharing you pirated internet streams with their boxes and making money with it. What media player or interface the box is using is irrelevant, and at least I would prefer not to name and shame some innocent open source community hobby project for it. Hunt down the pirates and people making money with piracy, but do not attack the media player, it's ridiculous. It's like banning fishing rods to prevent illegal fishing?
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  • People, there is NOTHING wrong with Kodi, the problem is that it is open source and therefore open to unscrupulous developers who then develop add-ons that allow users to stream pirated content. Please educate yourselves, too many knee-jerk comments here from people who don't even know what Kodi is:

    https://www.howtogeek.com/290346/kodi-is-not-a-piracy-application/

    http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/feature/photo-video/is-kodi-legal-streaming-movies-tv-3640854/

    Kodi themselves, this time last year, already issued a warning about box sets:
    Kodi own the label and anyone NOT from Kodi who is selling boxes for profit are in violation of copyright laws:

    "We now own the trademark to Kodi, and we plan to use it to finally battle the mass confusion created by those seeking to profit on unaware users.

    This means we will issue trademark takedown notices anywhere we think the likelihood for confusion is high. If you are selling a box on your website designed to trick users into thinking broken add-ons come from us and work perfectly, so you can make a buck, we’re going to do everything we can to stop you."


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  • Richard Hipkin wrote:

    People, there is NOTHING wrong with Kodi, the problem is that it is open source and therefore open to unscrupulous developers who then develop add-ons that allow users to stream pirated content.

    Being open source is not a problem at all, and not related to the issue. The problem is ILLEGAL STREAMS available everywhere on the internet. What software you use to access these is irrelevant. Addons for Kodi just open this link within the fancy Kodi interface because Kodi itself is not designed to stream over internet, nothing else. Typically ANY media player can do this. Safe to assume most of you own VLC media player? It can open the same stream out of the box. So can your internet browser of choice. Don't blame Kodi or the addons for Kodi or their developers for piracy. They are not providing any content, nor is it their duty to censor the internet.

    I know you mean good and defend Kodi, but this kind of comments lead to the next uneducated question: "why is Kodi allowing such addons?!?!". Some people think the addons have some fancy magic algorithms to hack and decrypt streams and give free access. THEY DO NOT. They just open a link, for god's sake. A simple feature readily available on most media players and browsers nowadays, but not on Kodi because the developers have intentionally left it out of the scope in order to keep the focus on what Kodi is originally meant to be: a local media player for HTPCs. This is where addons come into the picture. Youtube addon for Kodi opens youtube.com. The addon developers are not responsible for the content on youtube.
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  • Most of the people who I know using it are using it to stream sports. They have done so because to watch all the football on TV in this country (UK) costs over 100 pounds a month. I don't think they are right to do this, but I do have some sympathy as previously they could watch everything for about half this. But with football TV rights now split between Sky and BT, the cost of both options is very high.

    If people are priced out of markets, they will turn to other options, be they counterfeit goods or illegal streams

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  • Gary D Williams wrote:

    USD$7.50 is expensive? Here it's £12 so count yourself lucky.

    At the end of the day you have two choices. To break the law or not. If you break it then you may end up getting caught.

    The cinema in the nearest big town (~10 miles) started charging £3 all day, every day, or £4 for a bigger seat.

    Another cinema has recently opened in the town which is nicer and more central, but it costs almost £10/ticket there so the older one has picked up quite a bit of business.

    With it being so cheap I've started buying popcorn to try and help keep it open at those prices as long as possible.

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  • TheRandomist wrote:

    Gary D Williams wrote:

    USD$7.50 is expensive? Here it's £12 so count yourself lucky.

    At the end of the day you have two choices. To break the law or not. If you break it then you may end up getting caught.

    The cinema in the nearest big town (~10 miles) started charging £3 all day, every day, or £4 for a bigger seat.

    Another cinema has recently opened in the town which is nicer and more central, but it costs almost £10/ticket there so the older one has picked up quite a bit of business.

    With it being so cheap I've started buying popcorn to try and help keep it open at those prices as long as possible.

    Sounds excellent, I wish cinemas near me would start doing that. If they started showing sports events too, might discourage the illegal use of Kodi addons
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  • its such a shame that a stellar open source project as old and valued as Kodi (formally XBMC) is being tarred due to thieves stealing copyrighted material and adding 3rd party scripts to faclitate it in Kodi.

    Shows you how out of touch BPI are if they claim this is the work of "KODI" utter claptrap.

    Are they going to make Google, Bing and any other site indexer illegal as they list torrents if someone searches? (No, I didnt think so either)

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  • Listen to what people are asking for content providers!!

    What we need is an open, non -partisan marketplace where I can buy content at a reasonable cost regardless of the content supplier.

    At the moment to watch the TV series and sport in which I am interested I need  @ £7.99 Netflix account,

    a paid monthly Amazon Prime account @ £7.99 and a paid BBC TV license @ £12 per month @ Sky Sports @ £18

    So around £45 a month and this doesn't include music and other content which isn't available form the above vendors. The brilliant thing about Kodi boxes and similar devices is that they group all your media content in one acessiable location,  this is what people want!! Not having to log into 5 seperate accounts to watch TV/Films! If the big media outlets were sensible they would partner up with Kodi or a similar platform to make their content available to all at a reasonable cost

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  • Surely the police have very competent IT departments, so why is there a debate about whether Kodi is illegal? Kodi is a tool plain and simple, like any other tool it can be abused, the same way a chisel can be attached to a broom handle and used as a spear. Does this mean all chisels should be made illegal, of course not!

    As a famous man once said "Guns don't kill people, people kill people." same goes for software, the police need to concentrate on those that are abusing the system and not use a hammer to kill a fly, I feel the real question here is "What happens when technology and those that use it, move faster than those who can police it?"

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  • Briser_fae_the_broch wrote:

    Whilst I am not arguing the widespread (and let's not take the holier-than-thou attitude here, it is widespread) use of these boxes is illegal, it could be argued that it is driven by the crazy high price of satellite TV which is itself driven by the stupidly high price the TV companies are willing to pay for Sport rights to out-do each other.

    Last year I noticed I was paying approx £80/month to Sky TV so I cut Sports and Movies which brought it down to £34/month, with that saving I bought myself a new camera as I would rather be outside taking photos than watching TV.  What I am left with is about 89% rubbish TV and maybe 1% good stuff like Sky Atlantic, the other 10% I could get on Freeview anyway.

    The nearest Cinema to me is Aberdeen which is 40 miles away.  So a trip to the Cinema for 2 people would be a 3-4 hour affair with food and fuel, probably cost about £50-£60.  If we still had one in my home town I would go more often.

    I have a Kodi box but have not switched it on for months, I found it irritating to use with constant updates etc. so if it is made illegal, I won't shed a tear.

    If I want to subscribe to Sky Sports let's say, I have to pay 3 times.

    Firstly, I have to buy a TV licence.

    Then I have to buy at the very least the basic subscription to Sky.

    Then I have to pay for the Sky Sports subscription.

    Even if I never want to watch anything from steps 1 & 2, I still have to pay. I can't just say "I want sports & not a damn thing else".

    Oh, if I want to watch it in HD, I have to then pay AGAIN for the HD sports channels.

    I think that the proliferation of piracy & the ease of getting pirated material, even for the technically incompetent, might move the TV companies to adopt a different payment model - one that is a lot more customisable. A lot more PPV sports events. No need to have subscriptions to services you don't want - you just say "I want to watch this match at 4pm on Sunday", pay a couple of quid and watch the game.

    Of course you'd still get people pirating this - you'll never stop it completely but I'm pretty certain it will reduce the numbers considerably.

    The music industry adapted - remember how home taping would kill it?

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  • Whats Kodi? 

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  • Mando wrote:

    ...

    Are they going to make Google, Bing and any other site indexer illegal as they list torrents if someone searches? (No, I didnt think so either)

    No indeed - think of all the tax income they would lose if they did that. Hmmm, actually considering the taxes paid, it might even be enough to buy a couple of cinema tickets! ;)
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  • Become a big enough fish in enabling content piracy and even if your are not actually doing the piracy you will get targetted.

    Please note the "enabling content piracy".

    This is the key. Piracy is so far widespread and publicised for ease of access, that it's no longer viable to attack the hosting of the pirated content, so they are targetting the enablers that actually make the content accessible.

    It's like saying i've got a baseball bat, but i've hammered some nails into it myself.
    And someone then banning baseball bats.

    It's the enabler that they are blocking.

    This is a very narrow minded approach @ piracy, as this doesn't block the content.
    The smart way @ piracy would be to actually push out pirated copies themselves, and flood the market with trash making piracy much more difficult.to access @ a reasonable quality.

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  • mattroberts wrote:

    Sounds excellent, I wish cinemas near me would start doing that. If they started showing sports events too, might discourage the illegal use of Kodi addons
    Don't we have pubs for that exact reason? I can't picture watching a football game in a cinema (though I recognise pub football is not for everyone!)
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  • jakopjage wrote:

    Gary D Williams wrote:

    aliqamar wrote:

    won't it hurt a lot of people if it gets banned with the illegal label on it?

    Oh come on, it's pretty obvious that a box which runs software that can access pay for content for free isn't doing so legally. If people can't figure that out then maybe they need to have the law book thrown at them to knock some sense into them.
    Just to be clear, neither Kodi nor any of the addons have ANY software features that gives access to paid content for free. The illegal pirated stream is readily available on the internet and someone just made an addon for Kodi to access that stream from nice sofa&remote friendlty interface. Kodi or the addon developers are not responsible of that. Just head to piratedmoviestreamofyourchoice.com and start streaming, they probably have a web player too.

    Only thing the Kodi addon does is open this link from the internet and stream it. ANY media player can do it. ANY browser can do it. Well, actually Kodi cannot do it, but you can make addons with that feature.

    Opening a link is not some special Kodi-related software feature. Kodi is just one media player among others. Just with arguably the best interface for remote control use.

    So what is illegal here is the box sellers advertising that they give you free content by sharing you pirated internet streams with their boxes and making money with it. What media player or interface the box is using is irrelevant, and at least I would prefer not to name and shame some innocent open source community hobby project for it. Hunt down the pirates and people making money with piracy, but do not attack the media player, it's ridiculous. It's like banning fishing rods to prevent illegal fishing?
    A sensible point made, the issue here is whether it will be possible to make watching a stream of 'pirated content' illegal. So If I stream some pirated content and you view it are you somehow guilty by association? Definitely a cause for further debate, the discussion is slightly more nuanced than whether it is or isn't ok to have a Kodi enabled box
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  • Alex Wood UK wrote:

    Briser_fae_the_broch wrote:

    Whilst I am not arguing the widespread (and let's not take the holier-than-thou attitude here, it is widespread) use of these boxes is illegal, it could be argued that it is driven by the crazy high price of satellite TV which is itself driven by the stupidly high price the TV companies are willing to pay for Sport rights to out-do each other.

    Last year I noticed I was paying approx £80/month to Sky TV so I cut Sports and Movies which brought it down to £34/month, with that saving I bought myself a new camera as I would rather be outside taking photos than watching TV.  What I am left with is about 89% rubbish TV and maybe 1% good stuff like Sky Atlantic, the other 10% I could get on Freeview anyway.

    The nearest Cinema to me is Aberdeen which is 40 miles away.  So a trip to the Cinema for 2 people would be a 3-4 hour affair with food and fuel, probably cost about £50-£60.  If we still had one in my home town I would go more often.

    I have a Kodi box but have not switched it on for months, I found it irritating to use with constant updates etc. so if it is made illegal, I won't shed a tear.

    If I want to subscribe to Sky Sports let's say, I have to pay 3 times.

    Firstly, I have to buy a TV licence.

    Then I have to buy at the very least the basic subscription to Sky.

    Then I have to pay for the Sky Sports subscription.

    Even if I never want to watch anything from steps 1 & 2, I still have to pay. I can't just say "I want sports & not a damn thing else".

    Oh, if I want to watch it in HD, I have to then pay AGAIN for the HD sports channels.

    I think that the proliferation of piracy & the ease of getting pirated material, even for the technically incompetent, might move the TV companies to adopt a different payment model - one that is a lot more customisable. A lot more PPV sports events. No need to have subscriptions to services you don't want - you just say "I want to watch this match at 4pm on Sunday", pay a couple of quid and watch the game.

    Of course you'd still get people pirating this - you'll never stop it completely but I'm pretty certain it will reduce the numbers considerably.

    The music industry adapted - remember how home taping would kill it?


    Alex Wood UK wrote:

    Briser_fae_the_broch wrote:

    Whilst I am not arguing the widespread (and let's not take the holier-than-thou attitude here, it is widespread) use of these boxes is illegal, it could be argued that it is driven by the crazy high price of satellite TV which is itself driven by the stupidly high price the TV companies are willing to pay for Sport rights to out-do each other.

    Last year I noticed I was paying approx £80/month to Sky TV so I cut Sports and Movies which brought it down to £34/month, with that saving I bought myself a new camera as I would rather be outside taking photos than watching TV.  What I am left with is about 89% rubbish TV and maybe 1% good stuff like Sky Atlantic, the other 10% I could get on Freeview anyway.

    The nearest Cinema to me is Aberdeen which is 40 miles away.  So a trip to the Cinema for 2 people would be a 3-4 hour affair with food and fuel, probably cost about £50-£60.  If we still had one in my home town I would go more often.

    I have a Kodi box but have not switched it on for months, I found it irritating to use with constant updates etc. so if it is made illegal, I won't shed a tear.

    If I want to subscribe to Sky Sports let's say, I have to pay 3 times.

    Firstly, I have to buy a TV licence.

    Then I have to buy at the very least the basic subscription to Sky.

    Then I have to pay for the Sky Sports subscription.

    Even if I never want to watch anything from steps 1 & 2, I still have to pay. I can't just say "I want sports & not a damn thing else".

    Oh, if I want to watch it in HD, I have to then pay AGAIN for the HD sports channels.

    I think that the proliferation of piracy & the ease of getting pirated material, even for the technically incompetent, might move the TV companies to adopt a different payment model - one that is a lot more customisable. A lot more PPV sports events. No need to have subscriptions to services you don't want - you just say "I want to watch this match at 4pm on Sunday", pay a couple of quid and watch the game.

    Of course you'd still get people pirating this - you'll never stop it completely but I'm pretty certain it will reduce the numbers considerably.

    The music industry adapted - remember how home taping would kill it?

    Indeed with the current model Netfilx/Sky/Amazon/BBC are effectively a cartel - They need to open up the market.Content producers also being the content distributors isn't necessarily the best setup to give the consumer choice and value for money
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  • Simon Matthews wrote:

    Bryan Doe wrote:

    It drives me insane when I see friends on Facebook asking about cutting the cord.  I chime in that I have an antenna and so on, and then 5-10 of their idiot friends carry on about how they have a Firestick with Kodi and can get movies still in theaters, yet never stop to think what might be wrong with that.

    And then cinemas should also stop to think that the price they charge to see a movie is beyond ridiculous and drives more people to access content illegally.
    The theaters don't have a lot of control over what they charge for tickets. The studios control that for the most part. The theaters make very little money from ticket sales.
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  • Tim9716 wrote:

    The brilliant thing about Kodi boxes and similar devices is that they group all your media content in one acessiable location,  

    I've a media server that does this. The Amazon firestick does this (to a degree) but then I don't want all the Sky sports or film packages so I'm happy.
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  • Gary D Williams wrote:

    Tim9716 wrote:

    The brilliant thing about Kodi boxes and similar devices is that they group all your media content in one acessiable location,  

    I've a media server that does this. The Amazon firestick does this (to a degree) but then I don't want all the Sky sports or film packages so I'm happy.
    I have used Plex in the past and some of the Kodi builds out here will install Plex or Sopcast as part of their setup. 

    Perhaps as the idea of having a media server becomes more widespread some really simple media server programs which require little or no IT knowledge will become available (Or more well known) to the public (If not already)

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  • Spartan117458 wrote:

    Simon Matthews wrote:

    Bryan Doe wrote:

    It drives me insane when I see friends on Facebook asking about cutting the cord.  I chime in that I have an antenna and so on, and then 5-10 of their idiot friends carry on about how they have a Firestick with Kodi and can get movies still in theaters, yet never stop to think what might be wrong with that.

    And then cinemas should also stop to think that the price they charge to see a movie is beyond ridiculous and drives more people to access content illegally.
    The theaters don't have a lot of control over what they charge for tickets. The studios control that for the most part. The theaters make very little money from ticket sales.

    For the $13 a ticket, $5 for a 20oz bottle of water and $5 for a bag of Skittles, there has to be some money being made somewhere (USD) (though, our local theater has had major staff and management issues for years, but that's besides the point).

    As for Kodi\Kodi boxes being illegal because of people doing dumb things with them: THIS IS WHY WE CAN'T HAVE NICE THINGS!

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  • I had to laugh when, here in Canada, news articles featuring prominent lawyers started springing up that these boxes should be legal and aren't, technically, ILLEGAL! I mean, what kind of twisted mind thinks that? Other than the majority of commentors I see in political forums, I guess...

    Way back in the days of Pirate BBS' and such, or IRC, you needed a level of technical skill, and some social clout, in order to access this type of material. This kept access small, and a good amount of people would actually go out and buy the stuff they liked, based on their being able to try it first. It wasn't, and still isn't, worth it to the companies concerned to crack down on this, because it isn't hurting them a lot.

    Now, bring on Napster, the hacked DirectTV boxes of yesteryear, and 'streaming Android boxes'. Now you have sites/devices being mass-marketed to the General Public. Point at what you want, click, and you have it! They sell by the thousands, and people not only start cancelling their regular cable TV, they start cancelling their cheap streaming services like NetFlix! And the people start to actually think nothing can be wrong with this, and it doesn't hurt anyone, because quality media 'just happens', and all those types are overpaid anyway, right? Why buy, or even support, what you can get for free? Of COURSE there has to be some sort of crackdown...

    I liken this to 'Quick-Fingers' Tommy, the car-thief, opening up his own dealership down the block. $500 for any car that you want. Cash only...

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  • Tim9716 wrote:

    Indeed with the current model Netfilx/Sky/Amazon/BBC are effectively a cartel - They need to open up the market.Content producers also being the content distributors isn't necessarily the best setup to give the consumer choice and value for money
    Yes, true.

    However, when the content distributors are not the content producers, you get Channel 5... :P

    I dread to think how much between us my partner and I spend on entertainment. We have the TV licence, Sky HD Movies, Amazon, Netflix, Xbox Live and Cineworld Unlimited Cards between us, and about the only one that saves us any money while providing the entertainment is the Cineworld card, as it's a fixed fee for as many films as you like over the course of a month, plus a big chunk off the concessions stand prices. (I'm not on commission; I'm just explaining why it works :D )

    We looked at a Kodi stick to put in the Xbox, but in all honesty, with the amount of apps on the Xbox and the assortment of computers around the house, there was little reason to get one, whereas a sizeable proportion of my colleagues kept asking me if I knew how to sideload Kodi onto a Firestick, along with the more dubious addons.

    When I asked them why, it was generally to watch films or sport without having to pay for it. And yet amusingly, these are the same people who say that it's perfectly fine to pay a sportsman to half a million quid to kick a football around for 90 minutes on a Saturday.

    As an aside, I used to get complained at about 15 years ago by a colleague for acquiring MP3s from Kazaa or wherever else I used back then, as I was stealing from the artists - and yet I think I ended up buying more albums after being able to check out more pieces by bands I didn't know. The only other things I acquired were things that could not be got elsewhere, like the TV series Threshold which I don't think has been repeated or released on DVD since it was first shown over here.

    It is unfortunate that the only reason people that I know seem to want Kodi is nick stuff - as is said multiple times above, this is not the fault of Kodi. There are other systems out there that are just as open to abuse - it just so happens that people have heard the name Kodi and it's stuck like some other form of genericised trademark like hoover or thermos.

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  • Why is there always somebody using the justification that "It's expensive" as the reason piracy is OK?

    Do you realize how many things I wish I had are too expensive for me to acquire?  

    The great thing about movies and TV is that you don't need it to survive.  If you don't have the  money to pay for it, or it's not worth the money to pay for it for you, than aw shucks, guess you don't get to see that movie.  But I personally would LOVE for things like DRM to not break products because they have to go out of their way to keep people from stealing. 

    I just don't understand this mentality...never will.

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  • Its not so much that Kodi is illegal, its the specific add-on's that allow you to access paid content for free which are illegal.

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  • Brian - Pusher of Buttons wrote:

    Why is there always somebody using the justification that "It's expensive" as the reason piracy is OK?

    Do you realize how many things I wish I had are too expensive for me to acquire?  

    The great thing about movies and TV is that you don't need it to survive.  If you don't have the  money to pay for it, or it's not worth the money to pay for it for you, than aw shucks, guess you don't get to see that movie.  But I personally would LOVE for things like DRM to not break products because they have to go out of their way to keep people from stealing. 

    I just don't understand this mentality...never will.

    People have that mindset because they are forced to buy bundles that bundle a load of other crap they don't want in order to get the stuff they do want. The industry needs to adapt. There is no question about that.

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  • Simon Matthews wrote:

    Bryan Doe wrote:

    It drives me insane when I see friends on Facebook asking about cutting the cord.  I chime in that I have an antenna and so on, and then 5-10 of their idiot friends carry on about how they have a Firestick with Kodi and can get movies still in theaters, yet never stop to think what might be wrong with that.

    And then cinemas should also stop to think that the price they charge to see a movie is beyond ridiculous and drives more people to access content illegally.
    In many areas the prices are set by the studios.  When I was a projectionist, Disney films were price locked and the theater had to surrender 100% of the sales for the first two weeks.  They can could keep 30% of weeks 3's take.  And it would go up 20% each week from there.  And that my friends is why concessions are soo expensive, they keep the lights on.
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  • Simon Matthews wrote:

    Is that USD$7.50? I find that to still be a little bit too expensive. There are no good options for cinema viewing like there is for streaming. Where are the subscription deals for cinemas? $10 a month all the movies you want (booking required) would be great. They will still charge moronic amounts for the lobby food.

    https://www.dailydot.com/via/amc-unlimited-movie-pass-new-netflix/ 

    "Last week, AMC Theaters announced their plans to roll out an Unlimited Movie Pass; for a fixed price ($35 for conventional movies and $45 for the “premium package,” which includes IMAX and 3D films), the pass allows you to watch a movie a day for a flat monthly fee. Boston and Denver will be the first cities to get the package with more cities to follow, depending on the success of the trial run in January."

    (Note: This article is from December 2015)

    https://www.engadget.com/2016/07/12/moviepass-unveils-new-prices-starting-at-15-a-month/

    "Here's the full breakdown of MoviePass's new monthly pricing:

    Tier 1 markets: $15 for 2 movies; $22 for 3 movies; and $40 for unlimited.Tier 2 markets: $18 for 2 movies; $27 for 3 movies; and $45 unlimited.Tier 3 markets: $21 for 2 movies; $31 for 3 movies; $50 for unlimited. "

    (July 2016)


    Here in fairly rural WI I pay around $8/ticket, $12 for recliner seats, $5 for either on Tuesdays. :-)

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  • jakopjage wrote:

    Gary D Williams wrote:

    aliqamar wrote:

    won't it hurt a lot of people if it gets banned with the illegal label on it?

    Oh come on, it's pretty obvious that a box which runs software that can access pay for content for free isn't doing so legally. If people can't figure that out then maybe they need to have the law book thrown at them to knock some sense into them.
    Just to be clear, neither Kodi nor any of the addons have ANY software features that gives access to paid content for free. The illegal pirated stream is readily available on the internet and someone just made an addon for Kodi to access that stream from nice sofa&remote friendlty interface. Kodi or the addon developers are not responsible of that. Just head to piratedmoviestreamofyourchoice.com and start streaming, they probably have a web player too.

    Only thing the Kodi addon does is open this link from the internet and stream it. ANY media player can do it. ANY browser can do it. Well, actually Kodi cannot do it, but you can make addons with that feature.

    Opening a link is not some special Kodi-related software feature. Kodi is just one media player among others. Just with arguably the best interface for remote control use.

    So what is illegal here is the box sellers advertising that they give you free content by sharing you pirated internet streams with their boxes and making money with it. What media player or interface the box is using is irrelevant, and at least I would prefer not to name and shame some innocent open source community hobby project for it. Hunt down the pirates and people making money with piracy, but do not attack the media player, it's ridiculous. It's like banning fishing rods to prevent illegal fishing?
    About time someone actually understands it. Copyright law covers the copying and/or distributing the content, neither of which Kodi or the addons do. As you mentioned, VLC is not getting sued because you pull up a stream in there; Google is not getting sued because you access it from a search; HP isn't getting sued because you the stream came through your system; LG isn't getting sued because it was displayed on their monitor... The individuals copying the media and creating the streams themselves are the ones that are violating copyright law. Proof: all it takes to cut off the media from Kodi and the users is for the stream to go down.
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  • Is it illegal to watch streamed copy written content? I watched "In the army now" yesterday on YouTube. Am I now a criminal? Should we have to be aware of what we watch in case the person streaming it does not have rights to stream it or does the burden fall on those producing the stream?

    My understanding has been it is illegal to share copy written content, but not illegal to watch it. But I am not a lawyer by any means...

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  • I would have said, illegal only if the Kodi developers allow the piracy plugins to be downloaded from their site. Which I'm not sure about as there are numerous plugins for download.

    Basically that was the issue with the Pirate Bay, that the operators refused to take down links to content even when notified that it was illegal. The webhost  basically cannot be held responsible for client-owned content except in circumstances where they endorse that content, by way of refusing to take it down.

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  • Jonathan1024 wrote:


    Here in fairly rural WI I pay around $8/ticket, $12 for recliner seats, $5 for either on Tuesdays. :-)

    The $7.50 (which is indeed USD) I mentioned earlier gets me a fully reclining seat, disposable pillow, and enough leg room with the chair all the way back someone can walk by.  The seats are so big the capacity went down.  And now other theaters in town are having to renovate.  If I feel like splurging there's one with an upper deck that costs $15, but I can buy drinks and no one under 21 is there.  My area may just be lucky, but it's awesome.

    Ultimately, the issue is Kodi itself isn't the problem, which I think everyone here knows.  And this is spot on:

    Brian - Pusher of Buttons wrote:

    Why is there always somebody using the justification that "It's expensive" as the reason piracy is OK?

    Do you realize how many things I wish I had are too expensive for me to acquire?  

    Cars and computers are expensive, I don't steal them.  Cable is expensive, so I ditched it too - I don't like the bundling games they play, but it's not up to me.  Why is Kodi vs. cable TV or theaters different?
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  • The whole industry needs to adapt. If movies came out on digital download and physical release the same day they went into cinemas, I'm convinced people would spend more money.

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  • danjames92 wrote:

    Brian - Pusher of Buttons wrote:

    Why is there always somebody using the justification that "It's expensive" as the reason piracy is OK?

    Do you realize how many things I wish I had are too expensive for me to acquire?  

    The great thing about movies and TV is that you don't need it to survive.  If you don't have the  money to pay for it, or it's not worth the money to pay for it for you, than aw shucks, guess you don't get to see that movie.  But I personally would LOVE for things like DRM to not break products because they have to go out of their way to keep people from stealing. 

    I just don't understand this mentality...never will.

    People have that mindset because they are forced to buy bundles that bundle a load of other crap they don't want in order to get the stuff they do want. The industry needs to adapt. There is no question about that.

    I hate that model as much as anyone. That doesn't mean I use is as justification for stealing. Instead, I'm just not a customer. I have a $20/month internet connection and a netflix subscription. That's it. I can't even remember the last time I went to the movies (although I think movie tickets are completely reasonable IMO). If you don't want to pay for something, find something else to do. There's more to life than being caught up on the latest season of the walking dead. If not, then I feel bad for you.
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  • Brian - Pusher of Buttons wrote:

    Why is there always somebody using the justification that "It's expensive" as the reason piracy is OK?

    Do you realize how many things I wish I had are too expensive for me to acquire?  

    The great thing about movies and TV is that you don't need it to survive.  If you don't have the  money to pay for it, or it's not worth the money to pay for it for you, than aw shucks, guess you don't get to see that movie.  But I personally would LOVE for things like DRM to not break products because they have to go out of their way to keep people from stealing. 

    I just don't understand this mentality...never will.

    There's a term for that mentality. A sense of entitlement.
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  • Bryan Doe wrote:

    Maybe in some places....here I pay $7.50 for a matinee...

    And then $30 for a bucket of popcorn and a soda.
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