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  • I have only worked on one system and I really liked it . We set it up thru Dell and its was flawless. Also the support was great and allowed alot of room for updating 

     

    http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?sku=A0613781&cs=04&c=us&l=en&dgc=SS&cid=27722&lid=628335

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  • I used to manage a hote/night club/restaurant and we used MICROS.  It's great and easy to use.  Order entry is very fast.  Running reports is super easy and has everything you need.  It'll even do inventory if you set it up properly (they will help you) so you only have to reconsile and place your orders!

    On a smaller scale, I worked at a restaurant with 3 stations and Micros was a perfect fit.

     

    http://www.micros.com/industries/restaurant-pos-systems.htm

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  • I use Aloha.  I think almost every bar here in Dallas uses Aloha, a handful use Micros.   

    http://www.radiantsystems.com/industries/hospitality/point-of-sale-software.htm

    I've picked up systems off eBay for dirt cheap.  Virtualizes very easily, POS stations are run on commodity hardware so it's easy to get a replacement, and plenty of support in the community.

    Not so cheap but very slick, Microsoft Dynamics POS. 

    http://www.microsoft.com/enterprise/industry/retail-hospitality/solutions/store-systems.aspx

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  • http://www.squirrelsystems.com/ quite common up here in vancouver.  I haven't worked with it myself but I know a bunch of the cafe's and restaurants use it.

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  • Wow.  Many suggestions!  I'm familiar already with some.  I guess few here actively support multiple systems that can comment on comparing different solutions.  I'd also love any input on costs.


    Thanks again!

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  • Radiant bought Aloha - two versions - table service and quick service

    Micros is the de facto standard for restaurants.

    Squirrel was around for years but not sure if still available

    Parr had an application too

    Expient is another application to look at.

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  • I worked as an installer for Micros, Digital Dining, and MaitreD.  During the course of those jobs I got to encounter all types of previous software installations and what clients liked and hated about all the systems.

    Micros and Digital Dining are rather robust.  Lots of different options to tailor to your restaurant or retail needs.  I would say these systems are similar when it comes to operations and reporting.  Digital Dining will come in a little bit cheaper than Micros because it runs on just about any hardware you throw at it.  At Micros they had a lot of proprietary stuff built in and you had to use their hardware.

    If your restaurant is going to include delivery, stay away from all of the above mentioned software.  They might tell you its possible, but they don't do it well at all.  The slickest software I've come across for heavy take-out and delivery would be PDQ or Speedline.

     

    Know what you get before you buy.  So many clients always gave us the "My old system could do it."  If your old system was so much better than why did you switch?

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  • We've used Aloha Table Service in a pub environment for 11 years now, and the software is great, damn near bullet-proof.  I'm happy to discuss it further with you offline if desired.  

    It has multiple failover scenarios for server, terminal, internet or printer malfunctions, and the hardware is pretty durable as well.  We ran on 4 old integrated touchscreen wedge terminals from Javelin for more than 5 years, running W95 with an NT server, running 24/7, 365.  Upgraded to an XP server and a mix of XP and W2000 terminals that I find used all over eBay and it just keeps on ticking.  We use their Gift Card system as well, which are handled like credit cards for payment or tips.

    Customization can be cumbersome, but it's not difficult or hard to learn.  Menu setup is pretty straightforward.  Servers learn the system quickly and can't screw it up--I know, ours have tried. Local support is OK, not great.  It needs a user group like this!

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  • http://www.speedlinesolutions.com/ Only one I have worked with. 

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  • It really matters what your priorities are and how you define your backup systems.

    Every POS mentioned has it's plus or minuses. The cloud is only good if the there isn;t a rain storm. If Time Warner frags its likely the order will not fire to the kitchen on a cloud based system but there are fixes.

    Another key consideration is how do you manage a payment transaction when the internet is down. Is there store and forward? Do you have to imprint and key them in later.

    With the adoption of ipad and itouch for tableside ordering there are some cool solutions out there. Look for the total cost of ownership to determine out of pocket cost/service/replacement over 5 years.
     

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  • I have a 3 - P1220 POS terminal with Back Office server and printers. They have Aloha Tableservice Softwares installed. These was used in restaurant in 2007 for about 9 months and the restaurant was closed. Now I am trying to put back to use and need help in setting it up in Oakland CA.. One of the key is also missing.

    Where do I start?

    Thanks

     

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  • Does anyone have experience using Square?  I heard it's the cheapest option but comes with a price: no customer service.  My start-up tea room has a low profit margin which requires low expenses wherever possible.  So far, thanks to the advice above, I'm looking into Micros, Radiant/Aloha, and Digital Dining unless anyone has alternative advice?

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  • If you want quality and simplicity of use. Hands down Aloha. It is the best system out there. The only 2 big companies that are in chains are Aloha and Micros. Both good systems but Aloha is a little more user friendly and also there Radiant  terminals are pretty much unbreakable. If they do break they put a brand new system in for you free of charge. 


    Downside Aloha is expensive---- but you get what you pay for

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  • Rename thread to "Least terrible PoS" I've never seen a PoS that wasn't total garbage, there are no exceptions.

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  • I used Micros when I was with BDs mongolian.  Good system.  Tons of report possibilities.  Almost too many options... but you can do EVERYTHING with it.

    Support was good... and you'd need it at least once a month because checks would always glitch out.

     

    I used Aloha when I was a Barista at Cosi.  Pretty easy to use, but I only did teammate functions on it.  It is one of the most expensive... but I don't remember ever having any major issues.

     

    I'm shopping for a new system right now.  There's so many out there... it's really a pain to figure out what's going to work since you're only talking to salesmen who will promise the world..  I really like ALOHA... but I don't think I can bring myself to spend that much on a system.

    Anyone ever heard of FOCUS POS?  Or anyone else have any suggestions for a Quick Casual Sandwich Shop that does some delivery?

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  • Has anyone had the chance to work with HIOPOS PLUS systems?  If so what do you think?  The system appears to be very user friendly and has all the back office tools that a full service restaurant can use.  However it is new to me and I am not sure how the run.  If anyone can give insight I would appreciate it.

    Thank you,

    Charles

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  • POSLAVU crashes all the time! If it wasn't for that it would be one of the more superior systems. I am currently using this system and my boss is looking to switch.

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  • I work with a lot of different solutions, Micros is a good way to go, especially the WS5a with Epson TM-T88 IV printers. But if it is a bit too costly, perhaps look into Compris (NCR) system

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  • Can anyone tell me about Maitred and if it is any good they promise alot but seem to nickel and dime you to death. Thanks Chris

     

    Kevin9796 wrote:

    I worked as an installer for Micros, Digital Dining, and MaitreD.  During the course of those jobs I got to encounter all types of previous software installations and what clients liked and hated about all the systems.

    Micros and Digital Dining are rather robust.  Lots of different options to tailor to your restaurant or retail needs.  I would say these systems are similar when it comes to operations and reporting.  Digital Dining will come in a little bit cheaper than Micros because it runs on just about any hardware you throw at it.  At Micros they had a lot of proprietary stuff built in and you had to use their hardware.

    If your restaurant is going to include delivery, stay away from all of the above mentioned software.  They might tell you its possible, but they don't do it well at all.  The slickest software I've come across for heavy take-out and delivery would be PDQ or Speedline.

     

    Know what you get before you buy.  So many clients always gave us the "My old system could do it."  If your old system was so much better than why did you switch?

     

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  • The ipad solutions are increasingly popular.  If you are a full service restaurant, Lavu and Ambur are good options. If you have a quick serve restaurant ShopKeep POS is a great solution. Square register can be used too for smaller operations, but they don't have real customer support.

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  • From an Owners prospective:

    PROS:

    - Micros is super easy to use.  Very intuitive. If you are computer smart you can do a lot of customization on your own.  Lots of different reporting functionality.

    - Employee training doesn't take too long.  Many Employees have seen it elsewhere so they pick it up quite quickly.

    - 24-7 service / parts.

    - Very organized.  From planning, to launch, to go live.  The process is well executed.

    CONS:

    -  GETS VERY EXPENSIVE.  Actual equipment cost may be comparable to Aloha, etc. but they require you to do an isolated grounded electrical network for their POS.  This is an additional cost when building out.  Service -- any type of menu programming(if you don't know how to do it yourself) costs hundreds of dollars.

    -  Not as reliable as you may think.  Somehow always breaks down when you need it most(Weekend nights).

    -  Service -- even though you get 24/7 service.  Many of the technicians are Level 1.  They really don't know what they are doing.  This can be frustrating when you are trying to get your system up ASAP on a Friday night.  (May take until Monday.)

    - UPGRADES -- constantly need to upgrade the system if you want to change credit card processing.

     

     

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  • Stay away from Accupos if you are looking for a restaurant system.  It will not even perform the basic of restaurant specific functions.

    We worked with Accupos for about 2 months and they could never make the system work.  Then they told us it had been over 30 days since we purchased it so they would not refund a penny even though they could not get the system to work.  I'd be glad to give details should someone want them

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  • Am Frank, who can tell between Micros and Aloha which one is expensive and which one is easy to use. thanks for comment.

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  • Squirrel all the way, we just added 3 Ipads to our system of 12 terminals. We use the Ipads outside and its just awesome, our service is great. Squirrel is way cheaper then Micros which is extremely expensive and grounding everything is just ridiculous. Squirrel will also run on any hardware and aren't used car salesmen and taking a week to address your issue if they will go out of there way to admit there is one. When we inherited the Micros system here we were told it was going to be a whopping 16,000 dollars to program and get up and running (the system was online still!) Talking to Micros about anything cost money and they charge right down to a cable end at 500% profit for them. Don't be a sheeple and get what gets the job done. Squirrel interface is also beautiful, I even have my picture as a icon on my special drink on my screen, Just love it!

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  • I am surprised no one has mentioned POSitouch, they've been around since the early 80s.  They have more features than most of the other guys out there.  They are in a lot of of the big chains, Cheesecake, Outback, DQ, Unos.

    I work for a dealer. When I was in the restaurant business we used Micros which I think is pretty good but I couldn't stand the support.  Aloha seems to be ok but from what I see on the message boards, they charge for upgrades and turning on some features looks like you have to be a programmer.

    According to the PCI council, there are no IPad solutions out there that are approved for PCI so be careful.  In fact, IOS isn't even listed on the approved payment apps list for OS.  Some of those guys will say they don't touch the CC so they don't have to be on the list, I would ask a QSA first.  Unless the reader does point to point encryption which increases the cost, the CC is touching the IPad or the Android.

    If your Squirrel system's IPads have CC readers on them, I would check.  We sell handhelds and tablets that run CE.  We do sell IPad and Android solutions but until they're approved to take CCs we're not slapping readers on them.

    I do think the most important factor though is the dealer in your area, how well their service is and if you plan to open more stores in more markets, can they support other markets.  Some of these new guys don't have local service and have very few employees. 


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