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  • No.

    Of course, to say no you either need to be in a position of authority, or have management with a spine.

    Spice (100) flagReport
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  • I personally wouldn't care. As long as she knows support for firm devices will come first, and parts and labor are her responsibility. There may be an issue with her trying to claim she should be reimbursed for toner she uses for WORK items. Might not want to open the door to that. Make her sign something.

    Spice (26) flagReport
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  • 25 feet? How far is the kitchen?

    Spice (90) flagReport
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  • Nope.  If you have a policy in place for printers, let that employee know about it.  Either that, or they can take it up the ladder.

    Spice (15) flagReport
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  • I would not, unless the higher ups approved and told her that she has to support it.

    Spice (7) flagReport
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  • No, No, No!   Next they will want you to take care of the toner/ink for it and then it will go downhill from there; everybody will bring in their cheapest Inkjet printers because they don't want to walk!  Don't fall into this trap!

    Spice (58) flagReport
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  • No way. Ridiculous request. Until I was told by management that I needed to do this, I would brush off the request. What happens whens she sues the company over having to pay for the supplies?

    Spice (14) flagReport
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  • *reads thread title*


    Spice (128) flagReport
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  • as has been said before me. No do not open that can of worms or you will be fighting uphill from here on out.

    Spice (5) flagReport
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  • Wow, this is a slippery slope. Depending on your company culture, this might be something to punt to HR or legal.

    Walking 25 feet isn't exactly a burdensome request.

    Spice (7) flagReport
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  • See if you can setup a "hold" feature on the unit for her. That way, you can reduce her number of trips to the MFP by spooling her jobs for her. When she passes by the printer on her way to the potty, she can punch in a code and -- voila -- all of her jobs are printed.

    Spice (15) flagReport
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  • I get so tired of company's catering to laziness, I would say no. If 25 ft is too much for her to walk maybe she needs to find another job. If you let this happen it will open the door to even more stupidity.

    Spice (14) flagReport
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  • Most definitely not. Tell them to get one of these.

    Spice (36) flagReport
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  •  Not just no, but AWW HELL NAW!!!!

    Bring in their own printer??? Ain't nobody got time for that!

    I was going to McDonalds for a QuarterPounder with Cheese and saw a girl screaming for help at the house across the way. She was trying to bring her own printer. I noped the heck outta there!

    No, no no no no nononono

    Negative ghost rider the pattern is full

    I'm going to go with what is NOPE for $1000 alex!

    All aboard the train to NOPEVILLE!

    Let me make it clear. NO. I wouldn't allow it if I was the last man on earth, you were the last woman, and to save the species I would have to breed with you on the condition you bring it in. Nope!

    Let me think about itNOPE!

    What in your right mind makes you think that'd be even remotely close to a bright idea? I've heard better ideas coming out my six when I am on the toilet in the morning.

    We wish you a merry HELL NOPE!

    Hope that helps..

    Spice (51) flagReport
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  • I wouldn't - what happens if it breaks, would she expect the company to support/replace it? Or changes her mind about supplying toner, and expects the company to reimburse her?

    Plus there's drivers too - a lot of personal printers have drivers that come with way more than what's needed to print. You'll probably be loading a ton of junk software that can negatively impact her PC on it.

    And then there's always cloud features - what if it's a multifunction printer that can scan to Dropbox? Could be some security/privacy risks there.

    I'd say no a hundred times over. If she has some documented medical condition from a licensed doctor who says she shouldn't be walking that distance, then it'd be reasonable for the company to accommodate her by providing an approved printer. Otherwise, she can walk. But a personal printer is just an awful idea.

    Spice (11) flagReport
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  • We don't allow personal printers to be brought in, but they're welcome to purchase/lease a smaller desk printer here.

    Spice (4) flagReport
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  • Either her manager needs to approve a personal printer or she needs to deal with it.

    Spice (8) flagReport
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  • I've got a manager asking me the same question. I told him my walk is farther to the printer, the communal printer is so much cheaper than his home printer that it's not funny, and if we can't justify a personal printer for HR, then he doesn't get one either!

    Spice (4) flagReport
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  • Great, thanks everyone!  My initial reaction was no too - just wanted to make sure I wasn't being unreasonable here.  Also: no, she does not have a medical condition that would preclude her from walking to the printer.  

    Pretty much pictured this happening:

    Spice (53) flagReport
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  • I wonder if 25 ft. would be too far for her to walk if there were FREE doughnuts???

    Spice (62) flagReport
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  • No way.

    Spice (3) flagReport
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  • Digital Man wrote:

    I wonder if 25 ft. would be too far for her to walk if there were FREE doughnuts???

    Not gonna lie I laughed pretty hard.

    Spice (20) flagReport
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  • As long as you don't have to support it and it's not on the network, who cares?  Just make sure that she and her boss knows that it's her problem.

    Spice (3) flagReport
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  • Where I work, if we allowed that, even though the user said they'd support the printer themselves they'd still come to IT for suggestions on how to fix it, especially if it didn't play well with any of our business applications. I wouldn't want even the possibility of getting pulled in on supporting a 'non-supported' device to come into the company. We already get enough of that with some of our 30+ board members coming to IT for help with their personal laptops.

    Spice (9) flagReport
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  • All I can think of is LAZY.

    How far do they walk from the car to their cubicle, how far is it to the toilets - does she want one of them next to her too just in case?

    Policy is policy and everyone should share the devices provided.

    If you allowed this now for a non-medial reason, what is someone says, well can I bring my own seat in, or my own monitor, my own.... when do you stop.

    Unless there is a medial reason why they cannot adhere to the same policy as everyone else, I see no reason to allow this,

    As for looking at holding jobs - Papercut will do this for you, they can if easier collect their prints on the way home, or even on their way in from the night before - you would login with your AD credentials and gather up your days work.

    • local_offer Tagged Items
    • PaperCutPaperCutstar4.7
    Spice (4) flagReport
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  • Jeremy_F wrote:

    I have an end user who feels that walking 25 feet to the shared printer is too much work, so she wants to bring in her laser printer from home and have it set up in her cubicle.  She said she will supply all the toner, even though it will be used for work.  What do you guys think?  Would you allow this?




    Spice (13) flagReport
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  • Heck no because next they will be asking for their own person toilet. 

    Spice (3) flagReport
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  • More to the point:

    What's your company's policy regarding BYOD? Because allowing her to bring this into the office without policy coverage is flat-out asking for trouble. What happens if it gets damaged? Who picks up the tab when the fuser and/or imaging drum wears out? Who's on the hook for replacement if it gets stolen? And that's before we get into arguments over the cost of toner, because you know that's going to happen as soon as she realizes she'd have to spend $100 or more every X months.

    My take on infrastructure items is this:

    The company provides them in a way that is most advantageous to the company. Full stop. If an employee feels this is not "fair", they're free to present a proposal showing proper cost/benefit.

    BYOD happens with management approval, and only requests showing verifiable benefit to the business will be considered for approval.

    Spice (8) flagReport
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  • We have a standing policy. If it belongs to the company (in my case, the school), we support it. If it belongs to the user, we don't touch it. If they want to bring a printer in from home and use it, that's fine as long it meets our minimum specs AND AFTER it has been donated. At that point, it no longer belongs to the user.

    I DO NOT touch anything that is on the inventory. I have a saying that goes "If you touch it, you own it". If you touch someones personal equipment and it no longer works right, it is (de facto) your fault and you are responsible.

    Spice (6) flagReport
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  • Hi, I guess it depends on your company culture, if yours is anything like mine where CEO gets her own printer, HR gets her own printer etc, and there are no known policy on BYOD or whatever related to IT,  then you can probably ask her to justify for company to buy one instead.

    Otherwise, ask your Manager/boss, let him or her decide on it. That's what I would do.

    Spice (1) flagReport
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  • You should have a company policy that covers BYOD, and clearly lays out what is allowed, under what circumstances, and where responsibilities lie. The responsibilities should include support, running costs, insurance etc.The policy should be very clear on security, including credentials.

    Without that nothing should come near your network and equipment.

    I would argue strongly against allowing BYO printers for all the reasons stated in this thread.

    Spice (1) flagReport
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  • In my previous firm that was a haulage company we supplied own of our own printers to a client so they could print off their own shipping labels.

    It was set up on a standalone pc that was connected via a VPN to our office and the application for them to load their jobs and print their shipping labels.

    We had to supply the toner and maintain it. Well their main printer failed (they were only a small office with 10 people and they all shared a laserjet 5) so they suddenly hooked up the standalone pc to the network and started using our printer for all their print needs.

    Suddenly I was sending toner over every week rather than once a quarter. I went down there to see what was happening as their freight volumes hadn't gone up and when I found out I went through the roof. Told my boss what was happening and he said its only a toner cartridge once a week let it be. I then pointed out the cartridge was £100 a time and he made a phone call and stopped it straight away.

    The moral of the story - what may have been seen as a short term measure became standard practice - you allow one person to bring their own printer they will all want to do it. next will be my office computer is slow can I bring my own in from home to use.

    NO NO NO 

    Spice (6) flagReport
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  • The answer is NO. The first reason is that is everyone's responsibility to reduce paper use and so its disposal. Secondly, if it is really a need, the company should provide the printer. Anyway, I would encourage that person to talk with HR and with his department head. If once analised they consider that 25 feet is too far away and that there is really a need, then I would ask them to make a purchase order. 

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  • Make yourself one of these.

    Just never gets old.

    Spice (20) flagReport
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  • I definitely would, as long as they're supplying the toner and understand that I would only be able to provide minimal support for it (i.e. open the pdf user manual and ctrl + f, or turn it off and on again). I'd probably make them sign something though.

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  • Hell no. If that happens then everyone will want to do that. The problem then will be is the user say they might supply the toner but then then what about support? Are they going to fix it themselves? Of course not. The only ones who should have a "personal" work printer would be those in upper management.

    Spice (1) flagReport
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  • Absolutely not, company equipment in the office only. Besides if one person see's its cool to use their own stuff, other people will try to jump on the bandwagon which sets a horrible precedent..

    Vaugely similar; we had one of our self-employed field staff go out and buy a personal printer and supplies, then tried to expense it to the company!

    Ho ho ho, I don't think so sunshine!

    Spice (1) flagReport
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  • TonyJewers wrote:

    Make yourself one of these.

    Just never gets old.

    Cat-e-Gory 9 tales. I like it

     

    Spice (4) flagReport
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  • I wonder why people are saying no.

    I am not an expert but I dont see the reason as to why not.

    She will set it up, she will use it, she will be responsible for it, she will pay for its use, The company will be be responsible to support the device or for ware and tear etc. If you can confirm this with her in writing, why not?

    Only reason I read here was its a can of works, that other people will bring in their own printers.Its unlikely but if they did why is the an issue if they do not hold the company responsible for anything.

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  • Is there a. Medical reason? If so then we would provide printer. No medical reason then the answer would be no.

    Spice (2) flagReport
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  • i'd be curious to know what would happen to an insurance claim if it was discovered the fire was caused by a printer that didnt belong to the company.

    Spice (2) flagReport
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  • If you allow people to bring their own printers then you may open up an imperial can of worms - then others might come along at some point and claim - or worse, just assume - similar privileges on the basis of "but X got his/her own printer!"

    If you scale that up: Not only do you run the risk of being asked to support non-company hardware to some degree. Depending on what other people might have done already or may start doing then is put a lot of strain on your electrical systems. If a bunch of people decides to bring their own printers, PCs (nice one, chris.hone.5688) , coffee machines, heaters, fans, mini fridges, microwaves (yes, I have seen this happen!) and whatnot - that's a totally new world of hurt.
    And suddenly fuses start to blow because X is printing, Y is brewing up her morning coffee and Z is making microwave popcorn - and come winter, a few people turn on their own electric heaters. Pop goes the fuse - and  someone has to put in a big order anew because it wasn't saved yet when the power went out or that uber-important spread sheet or sales presentation is suddenly gone....

    Should you be fighting uphill at this point already, then do at least this:
    Have management approve it. If management is inclined to approve, make them aware of the downsides. Have that put down in writing and signed by everyone involved (a casual "sure, go ahead" in the hallway doesn't count). If they explicitly accept the risk (e.g. blowing fuses because of excess currents and potentially losing data over it as a result, fire hazards etc. ), then - and ONLY then! - full steam ahead. You're off the hook now, sort of - pending similar requests in the future or having to deal with the aftermath of something going horribly wrong.

    If things go south, put on your best poker face and say "Told you so...."

    TL;DR:
    Hell, no!

    Experience tells me that it's never "just that one $item".  

    Spice (4) flagReport
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  • I hate supporting the printers that I selected based on extensive research. I would not want to support a printer that somebody bought at Big-Box-o-Rama 'cause it was on sale.

    Spice (4) flagReport
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  • the ONLY time that I can think that a personal printer would be useful or even relevant would be somewhere like the DMV where each cubical needs to print multiple documents for each client that vary from client to client, so they cant be prepared beforehand. That or they have to print a different document every thirty seconds and its company policy to not leave anything on he printer. In which case, the hold order mentioned above would work better.

    Spice (1) flagReport
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  • Actually, I'm going to go the other direction with this and say why not? Have the employee sign something saying that they understand that they are using their own device that will not be supported, maintenance or repaired with company money or resources and let them have it. I don't think it would be that big of an issue. I had a teacher bring in her own printer to use as a scanner and put it in her classroom. I used this method and never had a problem. It all depends on your superiors and how your company reacts to certain things.

    Spice (1) flagReport
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  • Well...no...but...what the H has it got to do with IT?

    Or to put it another way, the request should be passed on to the business. It's a business decision, not an IT one. You make the recommendations, of course ("Dear CEO/COO, Lazy Susan wants to bring her own printer in because she can't/won't walk 25 feet to the one you have provided for her and everyone else. We in IT say this is a bad idea because of <reasons>. What would you like happen about this?") but ultimately, if that's what the business is OK with, then that's what you're OK with (even if secretly you're not).

    Spice (3) flagReport
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  • This is up to management. If they want to support it, then it should be. All of it should be clearly specified in the beginning of who pays for what, how it's serviced, etc. 

    As a director for IT, I like to stress to people that IT does not make decisions. We can provide advice about items like this, but our role is to handle requests (assuming they were approved). 

    If this is a small organization I could see management allowing it, in a large organization I would say no. The distance is not that far, most people do not have a printer sitting next to them. What's wrong with a little exercise everytime you print something. 

    Spice (2) flagReport
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  • Digital Man wrote:

    I wonder if 25 ft. would be too far for her to walk if there were FREE doughnuts???

    This. Is it more than 25' from the entrance to her desk? What about from her car to her desk? Unless this user has a physician-documented handicap that restricts moving that distance by foot more than x times per hour, she can walk. Hell, she can roll over to the printer in her desk chair for all I care.

    Some quick Googling shows that the average person walks at a pace of 4.53 ft/sec. A round trip to the printer and back is 25' * 2 = 50' which comes out to 50 ft/4.53 ft per sec= ~11 seconds. 

    She might have agreed to bring her own supplies, but what about maintenance? Is she going to configure the printer and connect it to the network? What about configuring her PC to use the printer? Who is going to troubleshoot the device when it fails to print? What type of printer is she going to bring in? Does that model have a history of being at risk of being hacked, increasing your company's attack surface? Is she trustworthy enough to keep the device up-to-date to reduce that risk?

    All of these questions need to be asked and the associated cost to the company considered. If that cost is more than what it costs the company to pay her to walk for 11 seconds, then it is not a feasible path for the company to take.

    Spice (3) flagReport
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  • When we get requests like this, it is usually no, not going to happen.  There has been a few case by case instances where someone thought that a piece of gear they had at home would help them do their job, so it was decided by the user, IT and the manager that it would be allowed on a trial period, and after that time, if it was actually a benefit, the company would purchase a new one for the employee to use so they could take theirs home.

    I agree with most people that by allowing that 1 printer, you open up a 1 off item on your network, which now has to be setup on anything the user will need to print from, and (being most printers come with it), would also take up a spot on your switch, an IP address, and if you use MS, a CAL.  And that is all before you even print a piece of paper.  Then it becomes a question of who provides the paper, does it really use toner, or is it like most home printers that use INK which is stupid expensive, so how long before they try to get the company to pay for it, and where does the line go for personal use?  If they decide to print 3540651 fliers for this weekends rummage sale, is it allowed since you (guessing, but probably) wouldn't allow it on your other printers.  THEN, you get to start dealing with their neighbor either wanting their own, or wanting to be able to print to this one since it is closer to their desk.

    So short answer......

    Spice (4) flagReport
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  • I don't see this as an IT problem because the answer should be no unless a very strong case of the benefits it provides can be made. This is more of an HR problem, and they have the task of deciding what message we want to send to our employees. Be lazy or take the opportunity to stretch your legs and get your blood flowing?

    Don't enable an environment of laziness and contribute to your coworkers poor health choices. Many studies can attest to the need to get up and walk around once an hour for people who are sitting at a desk all day. Not saying it's your place to lecture them on their personal health, but you certainly don't have to help enable their poor choices.

    Spice (3) flagReport
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